UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-K


(Mark One)

x                                 ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006

OR

o                                   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission file number 001-32597

CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

 

20-2697511

(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

One Salem Lake Drive
Long Grove, Illinois

 

60047

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (847) 438-9500

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share

 

New York Stock Exchange, Inc.

Preferred Stock Purchase Rights

 

New York Stock Exchange, Inc.

 

Securities Registered Pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.   Yes x   No o

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.   Yes o   No x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   Yes x   No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer   x

Accelerated filer   o

Non-accelerated filer   o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).   Yes o   No x

The aggregate market value of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates was $705,724,833 based on the closing sale price of common stock on June 30, 2006.

55,172,101 shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.01 par value per share, were outstanding at January 31, 2007.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement for its 2007 annual meeting of stockholders (Proxy Statement), which is expected to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Regulation 14A on or about Monday, April 2, 2007, are incorporated herein by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Part I

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Business

 

1

 

 

 

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

14

 

 

 

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

24

 

 

 

Item 2.

 

Properties

 

24

 

 

 

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

24

 

 

 

Item 4.

 

Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

 

25

 

Part II

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

26

 

 

 

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

 

26

 

 

 

Item 7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

29

 

 

 

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

58

 

 

 

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

60

 

 

 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

60

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations

 

61

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss)

 

62

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

63

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity

 

64

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

65

 

 

 

 

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

66

 

 

 

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

106

 

 

 

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

106

 

 

 

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

 

108

 

Part III

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

109

 

 

 

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

 

109

 

 

 

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

109

 

 

 

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

109

 

 

 

Item 14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

109

 

Part IV

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 15.

 

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

 

110

 

 




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Part I

Item 1.                Business.

Our Company

All references to “CF Holdings,” “the Company,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to CF Industries Holdings, Inc. and its subsidiaries, including CF Industries, Inc., except where the context makes clear that the reference is only to CF Holdings itself and not its subsidiaries. All references to “our pre-IPO owners” refer to the eight stockholders of CF Industries, Inc. prior to the consummation of our reorganization transaction and initial public offering (IPO) which closed on August 16, 2005.

We are one of the largest manufacturers and distributors of nitrogen and phosphate fertilizer products in North America. Our operations are organized into two business segments: the nitrogen fertilizer business and the phosphate fertilizer business. Our principal products in the nitrogen fertilizer business are ammonia, urea and urea ammonium nitrate solution (UAN). Our principal products in the phosphate fertilizer business are diammonium phosphate (DAP) and monoammonium phosphate (MAP). For the twelve months ended June 30, 2005, the most recent period for which such information is available, we supplied approximately 24% of the nitrogen and approximately 12% of the phosphate used in agricultural fertilizer applications in the United States. Our core market and distribution facilities are concentrated in the midwestern U.S. grain-producing states.

Our principal assets include:

·       the largest nitrogen fertilizer complex in North America (Donaldsonville, Louisiana);

·       a 66% economic interest in the largest nitrogen fertilizer complex in Canada (which we operate in Medicine Hat, Alberta, through Canadian Fertilizers Limited (CFL), a consolidated variable interest entity);

·       one of the largest integrated ammonium phosphate fertilizer complexes in the United States (Plant City, Florida);

·       the most-recently constructed phosphate rock mine and associated beneficiation plant in the United States (Hardee County, Florida); and

·       an extensive system of terminals, warehouses and associated transportation equipment located primarily in the midwestern United States.

For the year ended December 31, 2006, we sold 6.3 million tons of nitrogen fertilizers and 2.1 million tons of phosphate fertilizers, generating net sales of $1.9 billion.

Our principal executive offices are located outside of Chicago, Illinois, at One Salem Lake Drive, Long Grove, Illinois 60047. Our Internet website address is at www.cfindustries.com.

We make available free of charge on or through our Internet website, www.cfindustries.com, all of our reports on Forms 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K and all amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Copies of our Corporate Governance Guidelines, Code of Corporate Conduct and charters for the Audit Committee, Compensation Committee, and Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee of our Board of Directors are also available on our Internet website. We will provide electronic or paper copies of these documents free of charge upon request. The SEC also maintains a website at www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.

1




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Company History

We were founded in 1946 as a fertilizer brokerage operation by a group of regional agricultural cooperatives seeking to pool their purchasing power. During the 1960s, we expanded our distribution capabilities and diversified into fertilizer manufacturing through the acquisition of several existing plants and facilities. During the 1970s and again during the 1990s, we expanded our production and distribution capabilities significantly, spending approximately $1 billion in each of these decades.

Through the end of 2002, we operated as a traditional supply cooperative. Our focus was on providing our pre-IPO owners with an assured supply of fertilizer. Typically, over 80% of our annual sales volume was to our pre-IPO owners. Though important, financial performance was subordinate to our mandated supply objective.

In 2002, we reassessed our corporate mission and adopted a new business model that established financial performance, rather than assured supply to our pre-IPO owners, as our principal objective. A critical aspect of the new business model was to establish a more economically driven approach to the marketplace. Under the new business model, we began to pursue markets and customers and make pricing decisions with a primary focus on financial performance. One result of this approach was a substantial shift in our customer mix. By 2006, our sales to customers other than our pre-IPO owners and Western Co-operative Fertilizers Limited (Westco), our joint venture partner in CFL, reached approximately 46% of our total sales volume for the year, which was more than double the comparable percentage for 2002.

In August 2005, we completed our initial public offering of common stock and listing on the New York Stock Exchange. We sold 47,437,500 shares of our common stock in the offering and received net proceeds, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions, of approximately $715.4 million. We did not retain any of the proceeds from the IPO. In connection with the IPO, we consummated a reorganization transaction whereby we ceased to be a cooperative. In the reorganization transaction, our pre-IPO owners’ equity interests in CF Industries, Inc., now our wholly-owned subsidiary, were cancelled in exchange for all of the proceeds of the offering and 7,562,499 shares of our common stock.

Operating Segments

Our business is divided into two operating segments, the nitrogen fertilizer business and the phosphate fertilizer business.

Nitrogen Fertilizer Business

We are one of the leading nitrogen fertilizer producers in North America. Our primary nitrogen fertilizer products are ammonia, urea and UAN. Our historical sales of nitrogen fertilizer products are shown in the table below. The sales shown do not reflect amounts used internally in the manufacture of other products (for example in 2006, we used about 1.7 million tons of ammonia in the production of urea and UAN).

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

 

 

Tons

 

Net Sales

 

Tons

 

Net Sales

 

Tons

 

Net Sales

 

 

 

(tons in thousands; dollars in millions)

 

Nitrogen Fertilizer Products

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ammonia

 

1,226

 

$

442.1

 

1,382

 

$

436.0

 

1,438

 

$

399.5

 

Urea

 

2,619

 

638.2

 

2,518

 

626.5

 

2,513

 

515.9

 

UAN

 

2,420

 

382.5

 

2,483

 

403.1

 

2,593

 

354.1

 

Other nitrogen fertilizers (1)

 

45

 

4.4

 

46

 

4.1

 

59

 

4.4

 

Total

 

6,310

 

$

1,467.2

 

6,429

 

$

1,469.7

 

6,603

 

$

1,273.9

 


(1)                Other nitrogen fertilizer products include aqua ammonia.

2




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Gross margin for the nitrogen fertilizer business was $98.5 million, $172.9 million and $193.8 million for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004, respectively.

Total assets for the nitrogen fertilizer business were $493.9 million, $552.5 million and $557.8 million as of December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004, respectively.

We operate world-scale nitrogen fertilizer production facilities in Donaldsonville, Louisiana and Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada. We own the Donaldsonville nitrogen fertilizer complex and have a 66% economic interest in CFL, a Canadian joint venture that owns the Medicine Hat nitrogen fertilizer complex. The combined production capacity of these two facilities represents approximately 20% of North American ammonia capacity, 32% of North American dry urea capacity and 18% of North American UAN capacity in 2006.

The following table summarizes our nitrogen fertilizer production volume for the last three years at our facilities in Donaldsonville, Louisiana and Medicine Hat, Alberta.

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

 

 

(tons in thousands)

 

Ammonia (1) (2)

 

3,158

 

2,778

 

3,356

 

Granular urea (2)

 

2,334

 

2,065

 

2,322

 

UAN (28%)

 

2,336

 

2,256

 

2,640

 


(1)                Gross ammonia production, including amounts subsequently upgraded on-site into urea and/or UAN.

(2)                Includes total production of the Donaldsonville and Medicine Hat facilities, including the 34% interest of Westco, our joint venture partner in Canadian Fertilizers Limited.

Donaldsonville Nitrogen Complex

The Donaldsonville nitrogen fertilizer complex is the largest nitrogen fertilizer production facility in North America. It has four world-scale ammonia plants, four urea plants and two UAN plants. It has the capacity to produce annually approximately 2.3 million tons of ammonia (most of which is typically upgraded into urea and UAN), 2.6 million tons of liquid urea (including amounts upgraded into UAN) and 2.7 million tons of UAN (measured on a 28% nitrogen content basis). With UAN operating at capacity, approximately 1.7 million tons of granular urea can be produced. Granular urea production can be increased to 2 million tons per year if UAN production is reduced.

We believe that this facility is the most versatile nitrogen fertilizer production complex in North America. With multiple production units for each product, the complex has considerable flexibility to adjust its product mix. Donaldsonville is located near the mouth of the Mississippi River and has three docks that can be used simultaneously under most river conditions. In addition, Donaldsonville is located on the Union Pacific railroad and the Valero Ammonia Pipeline, providing us with flexible and competitively priced transportation to our in-market nitrogen fertilizer terminals and warehouses by rail and pipeline, as well as by barge. The facility is capable of docking and unloading into its storage system ocean-going ship loads of ammonia and UAN, providing us with direct access to global suppliers. The complex has on-site storage for 70,000 tons of ammonia, 135,000 tons of UAN (measured on a 28% nitrogen content basis) and 83,000 tons of granular urea, providing us with flexibility to handle temporary disruptions to shipping activities without impacting production and also flexibility to purchase and store liquid product for resale.

3




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Medicine Hat Nitrogen Complex

Medicine Hat is the largest nitrogen fertilizer complex in Canada. It has two world-scale ammonia plants that have a combined gross annual production capacity of approximately 1.3 million tons and a world-scale urea plant that has a gross annual production capacity of 810,000 tons. The complex has on-site storage for 60,000 tons of ammonia and 70,000 tons of urea, providing flexibility to handle temporary disruptions of outbound shipments.

The Medicine Hat facility is owned by CFL. We own 49% of the voting common stock of CFL and 66% of CFL’s non-voting preferred stock. Westco owns 34% of the voting common stock and non-voting preferred stock of CFL. The remaining 17% of the voting common stock of CFL is owned by GROWMARK, Inc. (GROWMARK) and La Coop fédérée. We designate four members of CFL’s nine-member board of directors, Westco designates 3 members and GROWMARK and La Coop fédérée each designate one member. CFL is included in our consolidated financial statements.

We operate the Medicine Hat facility and purchase approximately 66% of the facility’s ammonia and urea production, pursuant to a management agreement and a product purchase agreement. Both the management agreement and the product purchase agreement can be terminated by either CF Industries, Inc. or CFL upon a twelve-month notice. Westco has the right, but not the obligation, to purchase the remaining 34% of the facility’s ammonia and urea production under a similar product purchase agreement. To the extent that Westco does not purchase its 34% of the facility’s production, we are obligated to purchase any remaining amounts. Since 1995, however, Westco has purchased at least 34% of the facility’s production each year.

Under the product purchase agreements, both we and Westco pay the greater of operating cost or market price for purchases. However, the product purchase agreements also provide that CFL will distribute its net earnings to us and Westco annually based on the respective quantities of product purchased from CFL. The product purchase agreement also requires us to advance funds to CFL in the event that CFL is unable to meet its debts as they become due. The amount of each advance would be at least 66% of the deficiency and would be more in any year in which we purchased more than 66% of Medicine Hat’s production. We and Westco currently manage CFL such that each party is responsible for its share of CFL’s fixed costs and that CFL’s production volume meets the parties’ combined requirements. The management agreement, the product purchase agreements and any other agreements related to CFL are subject to change with the consent of both parties.

Nitrogen Fertilizer Raw Materials

Natural gas is the principal raw material, as well as the primary fuel source, used in the ammonia production process at both the Donaldsonville and the Medicine Hat facilities. In 2006, our natural gas purchases accounted for approximately 54% of our total cost of sales for nitrogen fertilizers and a substantially higher percentage of cash production costs (total production costs less depreciation and amortization). Donaldsonville is located in close proximity to the most heavily-traded natural gas pricing basis in North America, known as the Henry Hub. Medicine Hat is located in close proximity to the most heavily-traded natural gas pricing basis in Canada, known as AECO.

We use a combination of spot and term purchases of varied duration from a variety of suppliers to maintain a reliable, competitively-priced natural gas supply. In addition, we use certain financial instruments to hedge natural gas prices.

In 2006, the Donaldsonville nitrogen fertilizer complex consumed approximately 73 million MMBtus of natural gas. The facility has access to five natural gas pipelines which are owned by three companies and obtains gas from several suppliers. In 2006, the largest individual supplier provided approximately 40% of

4




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

the Donaldsonville facility’s total gas requirement. The Medicine Hat complex consumed approximately 41 million MMBtus of natural gas in 2006. The facility has access to two natural gas pipelines and obtains gas from numerous suppliers, the largest of which supplied approximately 46% of gas consumption in 2006.

Nitrogen Fertilizer Distribution

The Donaldsonville nitrogen fertilizer complex, which is located on the Mississippi River, includes a deep-water docking facility, access to an ammonia shipping pipeline, and truck and railroad loading capabilities. We ship our share of ammonia and urea produced at the Medicine Hat nitrogen fertilizer complex by truck and rail to customers in the United States and Canada and to our storage facilities in the northern United States.

Ammonia, urea and UAN from Donaldsonville can be loaded into river barges and ocean-going vessels for direct shipment to domestic customers, transport to storage facilities, or export. We own six ammonia river barges with a total capacity of approximately 16,400 tons. We contract on a dedicated basis for tug services and the operation of these barges. As of December 31, 2006, we had 16 UAN river barges contracted on a dedicated basis with a total capacity of approximately 48,000 tons. Additional ammonia and UAN barge capacity is contracted for as needed. River transportation for urea is provided primarily under an agreement with one of the major inland river system barge operators.

The Donaldsonville facility is connected to the Valero Ammonia Pipeline. This 2,000-mile long ammonia pipeline is used by several nitrogen producers to transport ammonia to over 20 terminals and shipping points located in the midwestern U.S. cornbelt. We are a major customer of this ammonia pipeline. In 2006, approximately 55% of our ammonia shipments from our Donaldsonville nitrogen fertilizer complex were transported via the ammonia pipeline.

We also transport substantial volumes of urea and UAN from the Donaldsonville nitrogen fertilizer complex and ammonia and urea from the Medicine Hat nitrogen fertilizer complex by rail. In addition to rail cars provided by the rail carriers, as of December 31, 2006, we had leases for approximately 500 ammonia tank cars, 1,000 UAN tank cars and 600 dry product hopper cars.

Phosphate Fertilizer Business

We are a major manufacturer of phosphate fertilizer products. Our main phosphate fertilizer products are DAP and MAP. Our historical sales of phosphate fertilizer products are shown in the table below.

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

 

 

Tons

 

Net Sales

 

Tons

 

Net Sales

 

Tons

 

Net Sales

 

 

 

(tons in thousands; dollars in millions)

 

Phosphate Fertilizer Products

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DAP

 

1,676

 

 

$

385.5

 

 

1,583

 

 

$

343.8

 

 

1,549

 

 

$

305.3

 

 

MAP

 

414

 

 

96.8

 

 

426

 

 

94.9

 

 

351

 

 

71.5

 

 

Total

 

2,090

 

 

$

482.3

 

 

2,009

 

 

$

438.7

 

 

1,900

 

 

$

376.8

 

 

 

Gross margin for the phosphate fertilizer business was $48.7 million, $36.3 million and $22.3 million for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004, respectively.

Total assets for the phosphate fertilizer business were $426.9 million, $408.9 million and $428.8 million as of December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004, respectively.

Our phosphate fertilizer manufacturing operations are located in central Florida and consist of a phosphate fertilizer chemical complex in Plant City and a phosphate rock mine, a beneficiation plant and phosphate rock reserves in Hardee County. We own each of these facilities and properties.

5




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

The following table summarizes our phosphate fertilizer production volumes for the last three years and current production capacities for phosphate-related products.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Normalized

 

 

 

December 31,

 

Annual

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

Capacity

 

 

 

(tons in thousands)

 

Hardee Phosphate Rock Mine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phosphate rock

 

3,805

 

3,647

 

3,280

 

 

3,500

 

 

Plant City Phosphate Fertilizer Complex

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sulfuric acid

 

2,598

 

2,507

 

2,455

 

 

2,640

(1)

 

Phosphoric acid as P2O5(2)

 

1,009

 

978

 

967

 

 

1,000

 

 

DAP/MAP

 

2,023

 

1,945

 

1,933

 

 

2,040

 

 


(1)                Reflects 2005 and 2004 debottlenecking projects on two of our four sulfuric acid plants, which have increased our total sulfuric acid capacity by approximately 200,000 tons per year.

(2)                P2O5 is the basic measure of the nutrient content in phosphate fertilizer products.

Hardee County Phosphate Rock Mine

In 1975, we purchased 20,000 acres of land in Hardee County, Florida that was originally estimated to contain in excess of 100 million tons of recoverable rock reserves. Between 1978 and mid-1993, we operated a one-million-ton per year phosphate rock mine on a 5,000-acre portion of these reserves.

In 1992, we initiated a project to expand and relocate mining operations to the remaining 15,000-acre area of the reserve property. The new phosphate rock mine began operations in late 1995 at a cost of $135 million. In 1997, we added approximately 20 million tons to our reserve base through an exchange with a neighboring rock producer. In 1999, we acquired 1,400 acres containing an estimated 8 million tons of rock reserves.

The table below shows the estimated reserves, as of December 31, 2006, at the Hardee phosphate complex. Also reflected in the table is the grade of the reserves, expressed as a percentage of bone phosphate of lime (BPL) and P2O5. Finally, the table also reflects the average values of the following material contaminants contained in the reserves: ferrous oxide (Fe2O3) plus aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and magnesium oxide (MgO).

PROVEN AND PROBABLE RESERVES(1)
Hardee Phosphate Complex
As of December 31, 2006

 

 

Recoverable Tons (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(in millions)

 

% BPL

 

% P2O5

 

% Fe2O3 + AI2O3

 

% MgO

 

Permitted

 

 

55.2

 

 

 

64.61

 

 

 

29.57

 

 

 

2.38

 

 

 

0.78

 

 

Pending permit

 

 

32.8

 

 

 

64.35

 

 

 

29.45

 

 

 

2.40

 

 

 

0.80

 

 

Total

 

 

88.0

 

 

 

64.51

 

 

 

29.52

 

 

 

2.39

 

 

 

0.79

 

 


(1)                The minimum drill hole density for the proven reserves classification is 1 hole per 20 acres.

(2)                The reserve estimates provided have been developed by the Company in accordance with Industry Guide 7 promulgated by the SEC. We estimate that 95% of the reserves are proven.

Our phosphate reserve estimates are based on geological data assembled and analyzed by our staff geologist. Reserve estimates are periodically updated to reflect actual phosphate rock production, new drilling information and other geological or mining data.

6




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Plant City Phosphate Complex

Our Plant City phosphate fertilizer complex is one of the largest phosphate fertilizer facilities in North America. At one million tons per year, its phosphoric acid capacity represents approximately 9% of the total U.S. capacity. All of Plant City’s phosphoric acid is converted into ammonium phosphates (DAP and MAP), representing approximately 12% of U.S. capacity for ammonium phosphate fertilizer products in 2006. The combination of the Plant City phosphate fertilizer complex and the Hardee mine gives us one of the largest integrated ammonium phosphate fertilizer operations in North America with the only purchased raw materials being sulfur and ammonia.

Bartow Phosphate Complex

We own a complex in Bartow, Florida that was idled in 1983 except for operation of one sulfuric acid plant in 1996-99 and minor phosphate production runs in 1985 and 1988/89. In 2000, we decided to discontinue maintenance on the phosphate producing portions of the complex. Through 2003, we used the plant’s warehouse to provide us with additional storage and shipping capacity. In 2004, we discontinued use of the facility as a warehousing operation. Our current objective is to minimize the ongoing costs related to the facility, including our obligations with respect to closing the phosphogypsum stack and disposing of the site’s process water.

Phosphate Raw Materials

Phosphate Rock Supply.   Phosphate rock is the basic nutrient source for phosphate fertilizers. Approximately 3.5 tons of phosphate rock are needed to produce one ton of P2O5 (the measure of nutrient content of phosphate fertilizers). Our Plant City phosphate fertilizer complex consumes in excess of three million tons of rock annually. As of December 31, 2006, our rock mine had approximately 16 years of fully-permitted recoverable phosphate reserves remaining at current operating rates. We have initiated the process of applying for authorization and permits to expand the geographical area at our Hardee property where we can mine. The expanded area has an estimated 33 million tons of recoverable phosphate reserves. We estimate that we will be able to conduct mining operations at our Hardee property for approximately nine additional years at current operating rates, assuming we secure the authorization and permits to mine in this area.

Sulfur Supply.   Sulfur is used to produce sulfuric acid, which is combined with phosphate rock to produce phosphoric acid. Approximately three-quarters of a long ton of sulfur is needed to produce one ton of P2O5. Our Plant City phosphate fertilizer complex uses approximately 770,000 long tons of sulfur annually when operating at capacity. We obtain molten sulfur from several domestic and foreign producers under contracts of varied duration. In 2006, CF Martin Sulphur, our largest molten sulfur supplier since 2001, supplied approximately 61% of the molten sulfur used at Plant City. CF Martin Sulphur was created in November 2000 as a joint venture between Martin Resource Management and certain of its affiliates (Martin) and us. On July 15, 2005, we sold our interest in CF Martin Sulphur to Martin. Concurrent with the sale, we entered into a multi-year sulfur supply contract with CF Martin Sulphur.

Ammonia Supply.   In addition to its 46% phosphate nutrient content, DAP has a nitrogen content of 18%. MAP has a nitrogen content of 11%. Ammonia is the primary source of nitrogen in DAP and MAP. Operating at capacity, our Plant City phosphate fertilizer complex consumes approximately 400,000 tons of ammonia annually.

The ammonia used at our Plant City phosphate fertilizer complex is shipped by rail from our ammonia storage facility located in Tampa, Florida. This facility, acquired in 1992, consists of a 38,000-ton ammonia storage tank, access to a deep-water dock that is capable of discharging ocean-going vessels, and rail and truck-loading facilities. In addition to supplying our Plant City phosphate fertilizer complex, our Tampa ammonia distribution system has the capacity to support ammonia sales to other customers. Sales of

7




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

ammonia from our Tampa terminal are reported in our nitrogen business segment. The ammonia supply for Tampa is purchased from offshore sources, providing us with access to the broad international ammonia market.

In the fourth quarter of 2005, The Mosaic Company and U.S. Agri-Chemicals completed the early termination of Mosaic’s existing phosphate rock supply agreement with U.S. Agri-Chemicals, and U.S. Agri-Chemicals ceased phosphate operations at its Florida phosphate facilities upon exhaustion of its remaining raw materials inventories. In 2005 and 2004, most of the ammonia sales from our Tampa terminal were to U.S. Agri-Chemicals. In 2005, we realized approximately $44.2 million of sales revenue on sales volumes of approximately 168,000 tons of ammonia to U.S. Agri-Chemicals.

Phosphate Distribution

We operate a phosphate warehouse located at a deep-water port facility in Tampa, Florida. A majority of the phosphate fertilizer produced at Plant City is shipped by truck or rail to our Tampa warehouse, where it is loaded onto vessels for sale in the export market or for transport across the Gulf of Mexico to the Mississippi River. In 2006, our Tampa warehouse handled approximately 1.3 million tons of phosphate fertilizers, or about 65% of our production for that year. The remainder of our phosphate fertilizer production is transported by truck or rail directly to customers or to in-market storage facilities.

Phosphate fertilizer shipped across the Gulf of Mexico to the Mississippi River is transferred into river barges near New Orleans. Phosphate fertilizer in these river barges is transported to our storage facilities or sold and delivered directly to customers. River transportation is provided primarily under an agreement with one of the major inland river system barge operators.

Storage Facilities and Other Properties

We currently own or rent space at 48 in-market storage terminals and warehouses located in a 16-state region. Including storage at our production facilities and at the Tampa warehouse and ammonia terminal, we have an aggregate storage capacity for approximately two million tons of fertilizer.

Our storage capabilities are summarized in the following table.

 

 

Ammonia

 

UAN (1)

 

Dry Products (2)

 

 

 

 

 

Capacity

 

 

 

Capacity

 

 

 

Capacity

 

 

 

Number of

 

(tons in

 

Number of

 

(tons in

 

Number of

 

(tons in

 

 

 

Facilities

 

thousands)

 

Facilities

 

thousands)

 

Facilities

 

thousands)

 

Plants

 

 

2

 

 

 

130

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

135

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

210

 

 

Tampa Port

 

 

1

 

 

 

38

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

168

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

135

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

285

 

 

In-Market Locations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Owned

 

 

20

 

 

 

680

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

245

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

361

 

 

Leased(3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

142

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

38

 

 

Total in-market

 

 

        20

 

 

 

680

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

387

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

399

 

 

Total Storage Capacity

 

 

 

 

 

 

      848

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      522

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      684

 

 


(1)                Capacity is expressed as the equivalent volume of UAN measured on a 28% nitrogen content basis.

(2)                Our dry products include urea, DAP and MAP.

(3)                Our lease agreements are typically for periods of one to three years.

In addition to these facilities, we also own our corporate headquarters, which is currently located in Long Grove, Illinois. In the first quarter of 2007, we expect to relocate our corporate headquarters to a leased office facility located in Deerfield, Illinois. We are currently seeking a buyer for our facility in Long Grove, Illinois.

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CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Customers

The principal customers for our nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers are cooperatives and independent fertilizer distributors.

The following table sets forth the sales to our major customers for the past three years.

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

 

 

Sales

 

Percent

 

Sales

 

Percent

 

Sales

 

Percent

 

 

 

(in millions)

 

Sales by major customer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agriliance (1)

 

$

490.2

 

 

25

%

 

$

555.9

 

 

29

%

 

$

481.8

 

 

29

%

 

GROWMARK, Inc.

 

240.2

 

 

12

%

 

255.2

 

 

14

%

 

206.8

 

 

13

%

 

ConAgra (2)

 

213.6

 

 

11

%

 

146.1

 

 

8

%

 

114.4

 

 

7

%

 

Others

 

1,005.5

 

 

52

%

 

951.2

 

 

49

%

 

847.7

 

 

51

%

 

Consolidated

 

$

1,949.5

 

 

100

%

 

$

1,908.4

 

 

100

%

 

$

1,650.7

 

 

100

%

 


(1)                Agriliance, LLC (Agriliance), a 50-50 joint venture between CHS Inc. (CHS) and Land O’Lakes, Inc.

(2)                ConAgra International Fertilizer Company, a wholly owned subsidiary of ConAgra Foods, Inc. (ConAgra).

Agriliance, GROWMARK, and ConAgra are significant customers of both the nitrogen and phosphate segments. A loss of any of these customers could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and the individual results of each segment.

GROWMARK and CHS are significant holders of our common stock. As of December 31, 2006, GROWMARK was the beneficial owner of approximately 9% of our outstanding common stock and CHS was the beneficial owner of approximately 3% of our outstanding common stock. In addition, William Davisson, the chief executive officer of GROWMARK, and John D. Johnson, the president and chief executive officer of CHS, are members of our board of directors. For additional information on related party transactions, see Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data., Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 30—Related Party Transactions.

In October 2006, we became a member of Phosphate Chemicals Export Association, Inc, (PhosChem). PhosChem was founded in 1974 in accordance with the provisions of the U.S. Webb-Pomerene Act and is the export marketing association for its members. PhosChem is the largest exporter of concentrated phosphate from North America and its member companies consist of: Mosaic Fertilizer, LLC, a subsidiary of The Mosaic Company; PCS Phosphate Company, Inc., an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan, Inc.; and CF Holdings. Beginning in October 2006, PhosChem became our primary means of exporting phosphate products. Sales to PhosChem represented approximately 5% of our fourth quarter 2006 consolidated net sales.

Competition

Our markets are intensely competitive, based primarily on delivered price and to a lesser extent on customer service and product quality. During the peak demand periods, product availability and delivery time also play a role in the buying decisions of customers.

In the nitrogen fertilizer business, our primary North American-based competitors are Agrium, Koch Nitrogen and Terra Industries. There is also significant competition from product sourced from regions of the world with low natural gas costs. Because urea is a widely-traded fertilizer product and there are limited barriers to entry, competition from foreign-sourced product is particularly acute with respect to urea.

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CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

In the phosphate fertilizer business, our primary North American-based competitors are Agrium, Mosaic, Potash Corp. and Simplot. Historically, imports have not been a factor, as the United States is a large net exporter of phosphate fertilizers.

Seasonality

The sales patterns of all five of our major products are seasonal. The strongest demand for our products occurs during the spring planting season, with a second period of strong demand following the fall harvest. We and/or our customers generally build inventories during the low demand periods of the year in order to ensure timely product availability during the peak sales seasons. Seasonality is greatest for ammonia due to the limited ability of our customers and their customers to store significant quantities of this product. The seasonality of fertilizer demand results in our sales volumes and net sales being the highest during the spring and our working capital requirements being the highest just prior to the start of the spring season. Our quarterly financial results can vary significantly from one year to the next due to weather-related shifts in planting schedules and purchasing patterns.

Financial Information About Foreign and Domestic Sales and Operations

The amount of net sales attributable to our sales to foreign and domestic markets over the last three fiscal years and the carrying value of our foreign and domestic assets are set forth in Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data., Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 29—Segment Disclosures.

Environment, Health and Safety

We are subject to numerous environmental, health and safety laws and regulations, including laws and regulations relating to land reclamation; the generation, treatment, storage, disposal and handling of hazardous substances and wastes; and the cleanup of hazardous substance releases. These laws include the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the Toxic Substances Control Act and various other federal, state, provincial, local and international statutes. Violations can result in substantial penalties, court orders to install pollution-control equipment, civil and criminal sanctions, permit revocations and facility shutdowns. In addition, environmental, health and safety laws and regulations may impose joint and several liability, without regard to fault, for cleanup costs on potentially responsible parties who have released or disposed of hazardous substances into the environment.

We have received notices from time to time from governmental agencies or third parties alleging that we are a potentially responsible party at certain sites under CERCLA or other environmental cleanup laws. We are currently involved in remediation activities at certain of our current and former facilities. We are also participating in the cleanup of third-party sites at which we have disposed of wastes. In April 2002, we were asked by the current owner of a former phosphate mine and manufacturing facility that we operated in the late 1950s and early 1960s located in Georgetown Canyon, Idaho, to contribute to a remediation of this property. We declined to participate in the cleanup. It is our understanding that the current owner is undertaking an investigation of the environmental conditions at the site. We do not know if a final remedy has been identified by the current owner and approved by the state. We anticipate that the current owner may bring a lawsuit against us seeking contribution for the cleanup costs, although we do not have sufficient information to determine when such a suit may be brought. We are not able to estimate at this time our potential liability with respect to the remediation of this property. Based on currently available information, we do not expect that any remedial or financial obligations we may be subject to involving this or other sites will have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

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CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

In December 2004 and January 2005, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) inspected our Plant City, Florida phosphate fertilizer complex to evaluate the facility’s compliance with RCRA, the federal statute that governs the generation, transportation, treatment, storage and disposal of hazardous wastes. By letter dated September 27, 2005, EPA Region IV issued to the Company a Notice of Violation (NOV) and Compliance Evaluation Inspection Report. The NOV and Compliance Evaluation Inspection Report alleged a number of violations of RCRA, including violations relating to recordkeeping, the failure to properly make hazardous waste determinations as required by RCRA, and alleged treatment of sulfuric acid waste without a permit. The most significant allegation in the NOV is that the Plant City facility’s reuse of phosphoric acid process water (which is otherwise exempt from regulation as a hazardous waste) in the production of ammoniated phosphate fertilizer, and the return of this process water to the facility’s process water recirculating system, has resulted in the disposal of hazardous waste into the system without a permit. The Compliance Evaluation Inspection Report indicates that as a result, the entire process water system, including all pipes, cooling ponds and gypsum stacks, could be regulated as hazardous waste management units under RCRA. If the EPA’s position is eventually upheld, the Company could incur material expenditures in order to modify its practices, or it may be required to comply with regulations applicable to hazardous waste treatment, storage or disposal facilities. If the Company is required to comply with such obligations, it could incur material capital and operating expenditures or may be required to cease operation of the water recirculating system that does not meet RCRA standards. This would cause a significant disruption of the operations of the Plant City facility. The EPA has referred the matter to the Department of Justice for enforcement. For additional information, see Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

We expect continued government and public emphasis on environmental issues will result in increased future investments for environmental controls at ongoing operations. Our environmental, health and safety capital expenditures in 2006 were approximately $2.7 million. We estimate that we will spend between $5 million and $8 million annually in 2007 and 2008 for environmental, health and safety capital expenditures. Environmental, health and safety laws and regulations are complex, change frequently and have tended to become more stringent over time. As a result we may be required to incur additional expenditures to comply with these laws and regulations, and they could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We hold numerous environmental and mining permits authorizing operations at our facilities. A decision by a government agency to deny or delay issuing a new or renewed material permit or approval, or to revoke or substantially modify an existing permit, could have a material adverse effect on our ability to continue operations at the affected facility. Any future expansion of our existing operations is also predicated upon securing the necessary environmental or other permits or approvals.

As of December 31, 2006, the area permitted for mining at our Hardee phosphate complex had approximately 55 million tons of recoverable phosphate rock reserves, which will meet our requirements, at current production rates, for approximately 16 years. We have secured the necessary permits to mine these reserves from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. We have initiated the process of applying for authorization and permits to expand the geographical area in which we can mine at our Hardee property. The expanded geographical area has an estimated additional 33 million tons of recoverable phosphate reserves, which will allow us to conduct mining operations at our Hardee property for approximately nine additional years at current operating rates, assuming we secure the authorization and permits to mine in this area. The estimated recoverable phosphate reserves are reflective of the anticipated permittable mining areas based on recent similar permitting efforts. In Florida, local community participation has become an important factor in the authorization and permitting process for mining companies. A denial of the authorizations or permits to continue and/or expand our mining operations at our Hardee property would prevent us from mining all of

11




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

our reserves and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Likewise, our phosphogypsum stack system at Plant City has sufficient capacity to meet our requirements through 2014 at current operating rates and subject to regular renewals of our operating permits. We have secured the local development authorization to increase the capacity of this stack system. Based on this authorization, estimated stack system capacity is expected to meet our requirements until 2040 at current operating rates and is subject to securing the corresponding operating permits. This time frame is approximately eight years beyond our current estimate of available phosphate rock reserves at our Hardee mine. A decision by the state or federal authorities to deny a renewal of our current permits or to deny operating permits for the expansion of our stack system could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In certain cases, as a condition to procuring such permits and approvals, we may be required to comply with financial assurance regulatory requirements. The purpose of these requirements is to assure the government that sufficient company funds will be available for the ultimate closure, post-closure care and/or reclamation at our facilities. In March 2006, we established an escrow account for the benefit of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection as a means of taking advantage of a safe harbor provision in a 2005 amendment to Florida’s regulations pertaining to financial assurance requirements for the closure of phosphogypsum stacks. For additional information on the cash deposit arrangement, see Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data., Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 9—Asset Retirement Obligations.

Several of our permits, including our mining permit at the Hardee phosphate complex, require us to reclaim any property disturbed by our operations. At our Hardee property, we currently mine approximately 300 to 400 acres of land each year, all of which must be reclaimed. The costs to reclaim this land vary based on the type of land involved and range from $3,000 to $20,000 an acre, with an average of $6,000 an acre. For additional information on our Hardee asset retirement obligations, see Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data., Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 9—Asset Retirement Obligations.

Our phosphate operations in Florida are subject to regulations governing the closure and long-term maintenance of our phosphogypsum stack systems. In accordance with those regulations, we closed the old phosphogypsum stack system at the Plant City phosphate fertilizer complex and are in the process of closing the phosphogypsum stack system at the Bartow phosphate complex.

At our Bartow phosphate complex, we estimate that we will spend approximately $4.5 million between 2007 and 2008 and another $10.3 million between 2016 and 2023 to complete closure of the phosphogypsum stack and cooling pond. Water treating expenditures at Bartow are expected to require about $2.4 million in 2007, $2.9 million in 2008 through 2013 and another $9.5 million in 2014 through 2056. Post-closure long-term care expenditures at Bartow are estimated to total $73.3 million for a sixty-seven year period commencing in 2007. To close the phosphogypsum stack currently in use at the Plant City phosphate complex, we estimate that we will spend approximately $10.1 million in 2023 and 2024, approximately $31.2 million during the years 2031 through 2037, and another $47.9 million in 2087 to close the cooling pond. Water treating expenditures at Plant City are expected to approximate $5.9 million in 2018, $66.6 million in 2033 through 2037, and roughly $103.4 million thereafter through 2087. Post-closure long-term care expenditures at Plant City are estimated to total $112.4 million for a fifty year period commencing in 2038. These amounts are in nominal dollars using an assumed inflation rate of 3%. For additional information on our asset retirement obligations, see Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data., Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 9—Asset Retirement Obligations.

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CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Cost estimates for closure of our phosphogypsum stack systems are based on formal closure plans submitted to the State of Florida, which are subject to revision during negotiations over the next several years. Moreover, the time frame involved in the closure of our phosphogypsum stack systems extends as far as the year 2087. Accordingly, the actual amount to be spent also will depend upon factors such as the timing of activities, refinements in scope, technological developments, cost inflation and changes in applicable laws and regulations. These cost estimates may also increase if the Plant City phosphogypsum stack is expanded further. For additional information on our Plant City asset retirement obligations, see Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data., Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 9—Asset Retirement Obligations.

Employees and Labor Relations

As of December 31, 2006, we had approximately 1,400 full-time and 100 part-time employees. Of these employees, 24 operators at one of our storage facilities are represented by a collective bargaining agreement with the United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union or United Steel Workers.

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CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Item 1A.        Risk Factors.

Our business is subject to a number of risks. If any of the events contemplated by the following risks actually occur, then our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial may also materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our business is dependent on the price of natural gas in North America, which is both expensive and highly volatile.

Natural gas is the principal raw material used to produce nitrogen fertilizers. We use natural gas both as a chemical feedstock and as a fuel to produce ammonia, urea and UAN. Because all of our nitrogen fertilizer manufacturing facilities are located in the United States and Canada, the price of natural gas in North America directly impacts a substantial portion of our operating expenses. Expenditures on natural gas comprised approximately 54% of the total cost of our nitrogen fertilizer sales in 2006 and a substantially higher percentage of cash production costs (total production costs less depreciation and amortization).

The market price for natural gas in North America is significantly higher than the price of natural gas in other major fertilizer-producing regions. For example, during 2006, natural gas prices in the United States (measured at the Henry Hub, near our Donaldsonville, Louisiana facility) averaged approximately $6.74 per MMBtu and in Canada (measured at AECO, near our joint venture’s Medicine Hat, Alberta facility) averaged approximately $5.76 per MMBtu. In comparison, during 2006, natural gas prices paid by fertilizer producers are estimated to have been approximately $1.25 per MMBtu in Russia and approximately $2.65 per MMBtu in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Many of our competitors benefit from access to lower-priced natural gas through manufacturing facilities or interests in manufacturing facilities located in these regions or other regions with abundant supplies of natural gas.

The price of natural gas in North America is also highly volatile. During 2006, the median daily price at Henry Hub ranged from a low of $3.67 per MMBtu on October 2, 2006 to a high of $9.92 per MMBtu on January 4, 2006. During 2005, the median daily price at Henry Hub ranged from a low of $5.53 per MMBtu on January 4, 2005 to a high of $15.40 per MMBtu on December 14, 2005. The volatility of the price of natural gas in North America compounds our competitive disadvantage to some of our competitors, who, in addition to having access to lower-priced natural gas, may also benefit from fixed-price natural gas contracts.

As a result of global competition in the fertilizer industry, we may not be able to pass along to our customers in the form of higher product prices the higher operating costs we incur due to our dependence on North American natural gas. For example, due to the high cost of natural gas during the third and fourth quarters of 2005 and the first quarter of 2006, we curtailed production of fertilizers at our Donaldsonville complex because market prices of nitrogen fertilizer were below our cost of production. Unless differences between the prices for natural gas in North America and other fertilizer-producing regions are reduced, or we are able to reduce our dependence on North American natural gas, the relatively expensive and highly volatile cost of natural gas in North America could make it difficult for us to compete against producers from other parts of the world.

Our business is cyclical, which results in periods of industry oversupply during which our results of operations tend to be negatively impacted.

Historically, selling prices for our products have fluctuated in response to periodic changes in supply and demand conditions. Demand is affected by population growth, changes in dietary habits, non-food

14




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

usage of crops, and planted acreage and application rates, among other things. Supply is affected by available capacity and operating rates, raw material costs, government policies and global trade.

Periods of high demand, high capacity utilization and increasing operating margins tend to result in new plant investment and increased production, causing supply to exceed demand and prices and capacity utilization to decline. In particular, new ammonia and urea capacity is expected to be added abroad in low-cost regions. Future growth in demand for fertilizer may not be sufficient to alleviate any existing or future conditions of excess industry capacity.

During periods of industry oversupply, our results of operations tend to be affected negatively as the price at which we sell our products typically declines, resulting in reduced profit margins, lower production of our products and possible plant closures.

Our products are global commodities, and we face intense global competition from other fertilizer producers.

We are subject to intense price competition from both domestic and foreign sources. Fertilizers are global commodities, with little or no product differentiation, and customers make their purchasing decisions principally on the basis of delivered price and to a lesser extent on customer service and product quality. We compete with a number of domestic and foreign producers, including state-owned and government-subsidized entities. Some of these competitors have greater total resources and are less dependent on earnings from fertilizer sales, which makes them less vulnerable to industry downturns and better positioned to pursue new expansion and development opportunities.

Recent consolidation in the fertilizer industry has increased the resources of several of our competitors, and we expect consolidation among fertilizer producers to continue. In light of this industry consolidation, our competitive position could suffer to the extent we are not able to expand our own resources either through investments in new or existing operations or through acquisitions, joint ventures or partnerships. In the future, we may not be able to find suitable assets to purchase or joint venture or partnership opportunities to pursue. Even if we are able to locate desirable opportunities, we may not be able to acquire desired assets or enter into desired joint ventures or partnerships on economically acceptable terms. Our inability to compete successfully could result in the loss of customers, which could adversely affect our sales and profitability.

China is the world’s largest producer and consumer of fertilizers and has been, and is expected to continue, expanding its fertilizer production capability. This expected increase in capacity could adversely affect the balance between global supply and demand and may put downward pressure on global fertilizer prices, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

We may face increased competition from Russian and Ukrainian urea, which is currently subject to antidumping duty orders that impose significant duties on urea imported into the United States from these two countries. The antidumping orders have been in place since 1987, and there has been almost no urea imported into the United States from Russia or Ukraine since that time. Russia and Ukraine currently have considerable capacity to produce urea and are the world’s largest urea exporters. Producers in both countries benefit from natural gas prices that are determined by their governments and which are well below the commercial value of natural gas in other regions of the world, encouraging urea production and potential export activity. Following a review by the U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. International Trade Commission, the antidumping orders were extended for an additional five-year period in November 2005. The decision to extend the orders has been appealed by the Russian producers. For a number of reasons, including available capacity, the attractiveness of the U.S. market and barriers to urea imports in other key consuming markets, we expect that if the decision to extend the orders is reversed,

15




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

imports of Russian and Ukrainian urea into the United States are likely to increase significantly, causing our sales and margins to suffer.

Any decline in U.S. agricultural production or limitations on the use of our products for agricultural purposes could materially adversely affect the market for our products.

Conditions in the U.S. agricultural industry can significantly impact our operating results. The U.S. agricultural industry can be affected by a number of factors, including weather patterns and field conditions, current and projected grain inventories and prices, the domestic and international demand for U.S. agricultural products and U.S. and foreign policies regarding trade in agricultural products.

State and federal governmental policies, including farm and ethanol subsidies and commodity support programs, may also directly or indirectly influence the number of acres planted, the mix of crops planted and the use of fertilizers for particular agricultural applications. In addition, several states are currently considering limitations on the use and application of chemical fertilizers due to concerns about the impact of these products on the environment.

We have a history of losses and may incur losses in the future, which could materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

We incurred net losses in six out of the last eight years; 1999 through 2003, and 2005. In future periods, we may not be able to sustain or increase profitability on a consistent quarterly or annual basis. Failure to maintain consistent profitability may materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

Adverse weather conditions may decrease demand for our fertilizer products.

Weather conditions that delay or intermittently disrupt field work during the planting and growing seasons may cause agricultural customers to use different forms of nitrogen fertilizer, which may adversely affect demand for the forms that we sell. Adverse weather conditions following harvest may delay or eliminate opportunities to apply fertilizer in the fall. Weather can also have an adverse effect on crop yields, which lowers the income of growers and could impair their ability to purchase fertilizer from our customers.

Our inability to predict future seasonal fertilizer demand accurately could result in excess inventory, potentially at costs in excess of market value, or product shortages.

The fertilizer business is seasonal. The strongest demand for our products occurs during the spring planting season, with a second period of strong demand following the fall harvest. We and/or our customers generally build inventories during the low demand periods of the year in order to ensure timely product availability during the peak sales seasons. Seasonality is greatest for ammonia due to the limited ability of our customers and their customers to store significant quantities of this product. The seasonality of fertilizer demand results in our sales volumes and net sales being the highest during the spring and our working capital requirements being the highest just prior to the start of the spring season. Our quarterly financial results can vary significantly from one year to the next due to weather-related shifts in planting schedules and purchasing patterns.

If seasonal demand exceeds our projections, our customers may acquire products from our competitors, and our profitability will be negatively impacted. If seasonal demand is less than we expect, we will be left with excess inventory that will have to be stored (in which case our results of operations will be negatively impacted by any related storage costs) and/or liquidated (in which case the selling price may be below our production, procurement and storage costs). The risks associated with excess inventory and

16




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

product shortages are particularly acute with respect to our nitrogen fertilizer business because of the highly volatile cost of natural gas and nitrogen fertilizer prices and the relatively brief periods during which farmers can apply nitrogen fertilizers.

Our customer base is concentrated, with certain large customers accounting for a substantial portion of our sales.

During 2006, three customers, Agriliance, LLC, a 50-50 joint venture between Land O’Lakes, Inc. and CHS, Inc., GROWMARK, Inc., and ConAgra International Fertilizer Company made combined fertilizer purchases of approximately $944.0 million from us, representing approximately 48% of our total net sales. Because we depend on these customers for a significant portion of our sales, we may have less flexibility than some of our competitors to diversify our customer base and seek more profitable direct sales to customers of our significant customers. Any substantial change in purchasing decisions by any or all of these customers, whether due to actions by our competitors, our actions in expanding the direct sale of fertilizers to the customers of our significant customers or otherwise, could have a material adverse effect on our business.

A reduction in the use of the forward pricing program by our customers or an increase in the use of product purchases to support the program could increase our exposure to fluctuations in our profit margins and materially adversely affect our operating results, liquidity and financial condition.

In mid-2003, we instituted a forward pricing program. Through our forward pricing program, we offer our customers the opportunity to purchase product on a forward basis at prices and delivery dates we propose. As our customers enter into forward nitrogen fertilizer purchase contracts with us, we effectively fix the cost of natural gas, the largest and most volatile component of our supply cost. As a result of fixing the selling prices of our products under our forward pricing program, often months in advance of their ultimate delivery to customers, our reported selling prices and margins may differ from market spot prices and margins available at the time of shipment. Under our forward pricing program, customers generally pay a significant portion of the contract’s sales value in advance of shipment, thereby significantly increasing our liquidity. Any cash payments received in advance from customers in connection with the forward pricing program are reflected on our balance sheet as a current liability until the related orders are shipped, which can take up to several months. As of December 31, 2006, our current liability for customer advances related to unshipped orders under this program equaled approximately 32% of our cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments.

We believe the forward pricing program is most appealing to our customers during periods of generally increasing prices for nitrogen fertilizers. Our customers may be less willing or even unwilling to purchase products on a forward basis during periods of generally decreasing or stable prices or during periods of relatively high fertilizer prices. For example, in the fourth quarter of 2005, a period during which prices for nitrogen fertilizer products reached record high levels, our orders under the forward pricing program declined significantly as our customers and their customers preferred to defer purchases of fertilizer products rather than commit to purchasing products at such high prices. Sales under the forward pricing program were lower during 2006, a period of relatively high fertilizer prices, compared to 2005, with forward sales of nitrogen fertilizer products declining from approximately 70% of our nitrogen fertilizer volume during 2005 to approximately 44% in 2006.

The forward pricing program is also less effective at reducing our exposure to fluctuations in our profit margins in circumstances where we intend to purchase the fertilizer product from third parties for resale, rather than manufacture the product at one of our facilities. For example, due to the high cost of natural gas in North America during the third and fourth quarters of 2005, we decided to curtail production at our facilities and increase our purchases of fertilizer products originating from off-shore,

17




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

lower cost producers for resale to our customers. Because it is generally not feasible to purchase fertilizer products from these third parties on a forward basis or match purchased quantities with specific order quantities, we may not be able to fix our profit margins effectively on fertilizer products that we buy for resale under our forward pricing program. One method we use to reduce our margin exposure on sales of purchased products under our forward pricing program is to purchase the required fertilizer products in advance of the specified delivery date. In such circumstances, however, we may be required to buy and store the product sooner and in greater quantities than if produced, thereby reducing the liquidity benefits otherwise associated with the forward pricing program.

Any significant increase in our purchases of fertilizer products for resale to our customers or any reduction in the use of the forward pricing program by our customers due to changing conditions in the fertilizer market or otherwise could increase our exposure to fluctuating profit margins and materially adversely affect our operating results, liquidity and financial condition.

Our operations involve significant risks and hazards against which we may not be fully insured.

Our operations are subject to hazards inherent in the manufacturing, transportation, storage and distribution of chemical fertilizers, including ammonia, which is highly toxic and corrosive. These hazards include: explosions; fires; severe weather and natural disasters; train derailments, collisions, vessel groundings and other transportation and maritime incidents; leaks and ruptures involving storage tanks, pipelines and rail cars; spills, discharges and releases of toxic or hazardous substances or gases; deliberate sabotage and terrorist incidents; mechanical failures; unscheduled downtime; labor difficulties and other risks. Some of these hazards can cause bodily injury and loss of life, severe damage to or destruction of property and equipment and environmental damage, and they may result in suspension of operations and the imposition of civil or criminal penalties and liabilities. For example, over the course of the past few years, we have been involved in numerous property damage and personal injury lawsuits arising out of a hydrogen explosion at our Donaldsonville nitrogen fertilizer complex in 2000, in which three people died and several others were injured. We were also involved in personal injury lawsuits arising out of a train derailment near Minot, North Dakota in 2002 that ruptured five tank cars, causing the formation of an ammonia cloud over the area, in which one person died and numerous others were injured.

Our exposure to these types of risks is increased because of our reliance on a limited number of key facilities. Our nitrogen fertilizer operations are dependent on our nitrogen fertilizer complex in Donaldsonville, Louisiana and our joint venture’s nitrogen fertilizer complex in Medicine Hat, Alberta. Our phosphate fertilizer operations are dependent on our phosphate mine and associated beneficiation plant in Hardee County, Florida; our phosphate fertilizer complex in Plant City, Florida; and our ammonia terminal in Tampa, Florida. Any suspension of operations at any of these key facilities could adversely affect our ability to produce our products and could have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, all of these facilities, other than the complex in Medicine Hat, are located in regions of the United States that experience a relatively high level of hurricane activity. Such storms, depending on their severity and location, have the potential not only to damage our facilities and disrupt our operations but also to adversely affect the shipping and distribution of our products and the supply and price of natural gas and sulfur in the Gulf region.

We maintain property, business interruption and casualty insurance policies, but we are not fully insured against all potential hazards and risks incident to our business. If we were to incur significant liability for which we were not fully insured, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. We are subject to various self-retentions and deductibles under these insurance policies. As a result of market conditions, our premiums, self-retentions and deductibles for certain insurance policies can increase substantially and, in some instances, certain insurance may become unavailable or available only for reduced amounts of coverage.

18




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

We rely on third party providers of transportation services and equipment, which subjects us to risks and uncertainties beyond our control that may adversely affect our operations.

We rely on railroad, trucking, pipeline, river barge and ocean vessel companies to transport raw materials to our manufacturing facilities, to deliver finished products to our distribution system and to ship finished products to our customers. We also lease rail cars from rail car owners in order to ship raw materials and finished products. These transportation operations, equipment, and services are subject to various hazards, including extreme weather conditions, work stoppages, delays, spills, derailments and other accidents and other operating hazards.

These transportation operations, equipment and services are also subject to environmental, safety, and regulatory oversight. Due to concerns related to terrorism, the potential use of fertilizers as explosives or accidents, local, state and federal governments could implement new regulations affecting the transportation of our raw materials or finished products. In addition, new regulations could be implemented affecting the equipment used to ship our raw materials or finished products.

If we are delayed or unable to ship our finished products or obtain raw materials as a result of these transportation companies’ failure to operate properly, or if new and more stringent regulatory requirements are implemented affecting transportation operations or equipment, or if there are significant increases in the cost of these services or equipment, our sales revenues and/or cost of operations could be adversely affected.

Expansion of our business may result in unanticipated adverse consequences and may be hindered by the significant resources that would be required for any such expansion.

In the future, we may seek to expand our business by investing in new or existing facilities, making acquisitions or entering into partnerships and joint ventures. Acquisitions, partnerships, joint ventures or investments may require significant managerial attention, which may be diverted from our other activities and may impair the operation of our businesses.

International acquisitions, partnerships, or joint ventures or the international expansion of our business could involve additional risks and uncertainties, including:

·       difficulties and costs of complying with a wide variety of complex laws, treaties and regulations;

·       unexpected changes in regulatory environments;

·       political and economic instability, including the possibility for civil unrest;

·       nationalization of properties by foreign governments;

·       tax rates that may exceed those in the United States, and earnings that may be subject to withholding requirements;

·       the imposition of tariffs, exchange controls or other restrictions; and

·       the impact of exchange rate fluctuations between the United States dollar and foreign currencies in the countries where we operate.

Furthermore, any future acquisitions of businesses or facilities could entail a number of additional risks, including:

·       problems with effective integration of operations;

·       the inability to maintain key pre-acquisition business relationships;

19




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

·       loss of key personnel of the acquired business or facility;

·       exposure to unanticipated liabilities; and

·       difficulties in realizing efficiencies, synergies and cost savings.

These risks of unanticipated adverse consequences from any expansion of our business through investments, acquisitions, partnerships or joint ventures are increased due to the significant capital and other resources that we may have to commit to any such expansion. We also face increased exposure to risks related to acquisitions and international operations because our experience with acquisitions and international operations is limited. As a result of these and other factors, including general economic risk, we may not be able to realize our projected returns from any future acquisitions, partnerships, joint ventures or other investments.

We may not have access to the funding required for the expansion of our business or such funding may not be available to us on acceptable terms. We may finance the expansion of our business with additional indebtedness and/or by issuing additional equity securities. We could face financial risks associated with incurring additional indebtedness, such as reducing our liquidity and access to financial markets and increasing the amount of cash flow required to service such indebtedness, or associated with issuing additional equity securities, such as dilution of ownership and earnings.

We are subject to numerous environmental and health and safety laws and regulations, as well as potential environmental liabilities, which may require us to make substantial expenditures.

We are subject to numerous environmental and health and safety laws and regulations in the United States and Canada, including laws and regulations relating to land reclamation; the generation, treatment, storage, disposal and handling of hazardous substances and wastes; and the cleanup of hazardous substance releases. These laws include the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, RCRA, CERCLA, the Toxic Substances Control Act and various other federal, state, provincial, local and international statutes.

As a fertilizer company working with chemicals and other hazardous substances, our business is inherently subject to spills, discharges or other releases of hazardous substances into the environment. Certain environmental laws, including CERCLA, impose joint and several liability, without regard to fault, for cleanup costs on persons who have disposed of or released hazardous substances into the environment. Given the nature of our business, we have incurred, are incurring currently, and are likely to incur periodically in the future liabilities under CERCLA and other environmental cleanup laws at our current or former facilities, adjacent or nearby third-party facilities or offsite disposal locations. The costs associated with future cleanup activities that we may be required to conduct or finance may be material. Additionally, we may become liable to third parties for damages, including personal injury and property damage, resulting from the disposal or release of hazardous substances into the environment.

Violations of environmental and health and safety laws can result in substantial penalties, court orders to install pollution-control equipment, civil and criminal sanctions, permit revocations and facility shutdowns. Environmental and health and safety laws change rapidly and have tended to become more stringent over time. As a result, we have not always been and may not always be in compliance with all environmental and health and safety laws and regulations. Additionally, future environmental and health and safety laws and regulations or more vigorous enforcement of current laws and regulations, whether caused by violations of environmental and health and safety laws by us or other chemical fertilizer companies or otherwise, may require us to make substantial expenditures, and our costs to comply with, or any liabilities under, these laws and regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

See Item 1. Business.—Environmental Health and Safety and Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

20




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Our operations are dependent on numerous required permits and approvals from governmental authorities.

We hold numerous environmental, mining and other governmental permits and approvals authorizing operations at each of our facilities. Expansion of our operations also is predicated upon securing the necessary environmental or other permits or approvals. A decision by a government agency to deny or delay issuing a new or renewed material permit or approval, or to revoke or substantially modify an existing permit or approval, could have a material adverse effect on our ability to continue operations at the affected facility and on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In certain cases, as a condition to procuring such permits and approvals, we may be required to comply with financial assurance regulatory requirements. The purpose of these requirements is to assure the government that sufficient company funds will be available for the ultimate closure, post-closure care and/or reclamation at our facilities. In March 2006, we established an escrow account for the benefit of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection as a means of taking advantage of a safe harbor provision in a 2005 amendment to Florida’s regulations pertaining to financial assurance requirements for the closure of phosphogypsum stacks. Additionally, Florida regulations require mining companies to demonstrate financial responsibility for wetland and other surface water mitigation measures in advance of any mining activities. If and when we are able to expand our Hardee mining activities to areas not currently permitted, we will be required to demonstrate financial responsibility for wetland and other surface water mitigation measures in advance of any mining activities. The demonstration of financial responsibility may be provided by passage of financial tests. In the event that we are unable to satisfy these financial tests, alternative methods of complying with the financial assurance requirements would require us to expend funds for the purchase of bonds, letters of credit, insurance policies or similar instruments. It is possible that we will not be able to comply with either current or new financial assurance regulations in the future, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

As of December 31, 2006, the area permitted by local, state and federal authorities for mining at our Hardee phosphate complex had approximately 55 million tons of recoverable phosphate rock reserves, which will meet our requirements, at current operating rates, for approximately 16 years. We have initiated the process of applying for authorization and permits to expand the geographical area in which we can mine at our Hardee property. The expanded geographical area has an estimated 33 million tons of recoverable phosphate reserves, which will allow us to conduct mining operations at our Hardee property for approximately nine additional years at current operating rates, assuming we secure the authorization and permits to mine in this area. In Florida, local community participation has become an important factor in the authorization and permitting process for mining companies. A denial of the authorizations or permits to continue and/or expand our mining operations at our Hardee property would prevent us from mining all of our reserves and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Likewise, our phosphogypsum stack system at Plant City has sufficient capacity to meet our requirements through 2014 at current operating rates and is subject to regular renewals of our operating permits. We have secured the local development authorization to increase the capacity of this stack system. Based on this authorization, estimated stack system capacity is expected to meet our requirements until 2040 at current operating rates and is subject to securing the corresponding operating permits. This time frame is approximately eight years beyond our current estimate of available phosphate rock reserves at our Hardee mine. A decision by the state or federal authorities to deny a renewal of our current permits or to deny operating permits for the expansion of our stack system could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

21




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Acts of terrorism could negatively affect our business.

Like other companies with major industrial facilities, our plants and ancillary facilities may be targets of terrorist activities. Many of these plants and facilities store significant quantities of ammonia and other items that can be dangerous if mishandled. Any damage to infrastructure facilities, such as electric generation, transmission and distribution facilities, or injury to employees, who could be direct targets or indirect casualties of an act of terrorism, may affect our operations. Any disruption of our ability to produce or distribute our products could result in a significant decrease in revenues and significant additional costs to replace, repair or insure our assets, which could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, due to concerns related to terrorism or the potential use of certain fertilizers as explosives, local, state and federal governments could implement new regulations impacting the security of our plants, terminals and warehouses or the transportation and use of fertilizers. These regulations could result in higher operating costs or limitations on the sale of our products and could result in significant unanticipated costs, lower revenues and/or reduced profit margins.

Our operations are dependent upon raw materials provided by third parties and any delay or interruption in the delivery of these raw materials may adversely affect our business.

We use natural gas, ammonia and sulfur as raw materials in the manufacture of fertilizers. We purchase these raw materials from third-party suppliers. These products are transported by barge, truck, rail or pipeline to our facilities by third-party transportation providers or through the use of facilities owned by third parties. Any delays or interruptions in the delivery of these key raw materials, including those caused by capacity constraints; explosions; fires; severe weather and natural disasters; train derailments, collisions, vessel groundings and other transportation and maritime incidents; leaks and ruptures involving pipelines; deliberate sabotage and terrorist incidents; mechanical failures; unscheduled downtime; or labor difficulties, could have a material adverse effect on our business.

The loss of key members of our management and professional staff may adversely affect our business.

We believe our continued success depends on the collective abilities and efforts of our senior management and professional staff. The loss of one or more key personnel could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. Additionally, if we are unable to find, hire and retain needed key personnel in the future, our results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

22




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements that are not statements of historical fact and may involve a number of risks and uncertainties. These statements relate to analyses and other information that are based on forecasts of future results and estimates of amounts not yet determinable. These statements may also relate to our future prospects, developments and business strategies. We have used the words “anticipate,” “believe,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “predict,” “project,” and similar terms and phrases, including references to assumptions, to identify forward-looking statements in this Form 10-K. These forward-looking statements are made based on our expectations and beliefs concerning future events affecting us and are subject to uncertainties and factors relating to our operations and business environment, all of which are difficult to predict and many of which are beyond our control, that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those matters expressed in or implied by these forward-looking statements. We do not undertake any responsibility to release publicly any revisions to these forward-looking statements to take into account events or circumstances that occur after the date of this report. Additionally, we do not undertake any responsibility to provide updates regarding the occurrence of any unanticipated events which may cause actual results to differ from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements contained in this report.

Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations are disclosed under “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Form 10-K. As stated elsewhere in this filing, such factors include, among others:

·       the relatively expensive and volatile cost of North American natural gas;

·       the cyclical nature of our business;

·       the nature of our products as global commodities;

·       intense global competition in the consolidating markets in which we operate;

·       conditions in the U.S. agricultural industry;

·       our history of losses;

·       weather conditions;

·       our inability to accurately predict seasonal demand for our products;

·       the concentration of our sales with certain large customers;

·       the impact of changing market conditions on our forward pricing program;

·       the significant risks and hazards against which we may not be fully insured;

·       reliance on third party transportation providers;

·       unanticipated consequences related to future expansion of our business;

·       our inability to expand our business, including the significant resources that could be required;

·       potential liabilities and expenditures related to environmental and health and safety laws and regulations;

·       our inability to obtain or maintain required permits and governmental approvals;

·       acts of terrorism;

·       difficulties in securing the raw materials we use;

·       changes in global fertilizer supply and demand; and

·       loss of key members of management and professional staff.

23




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Item 1B.       Unresolved Staff Comments.

None.

Item 2.                Properties.

Information regarding our facilities and properties is included in Part I, Item 1. Business—Operating Segments and Part I, Item 1. Business—Storage Facilities and Other Properties.

Our senior secured revolving credit facility is secured by, among other things, a security interest in our Donaldsonville, Louisiana, nitrogen complex.

Item 3.                Legal Proceedings.

Litigation

From time to time, we are subject to ordinary, routine legal proceedings related to the usual conduct of our business, including proceedings regarding public utility and transportation rates, environmental matters, taxes and permits relating to the operations of our various plants and facilities. Based on the information available as of the date of this filing, we believe that the ultimate outcome of these matters will not have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations.

Environmental

In December 2004 and January 2005, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) inspected our Plant City, Florida phosphate fertilizer complex to evaluate the facility’s compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the federal statute that governs the generation, transportation, treatment, storage and disposal of hazardous wastes. This inspection was undertaken as a part of a broad enforcement initiative commenced by the EPA to evaluate whether mineral processing and mining facilities, including, in particular, all wet process phosphoric acid production facilities, are in compliance with RCRA, and the extent to which such facilities’ waste management practices have impacted the environment.

By letter dated September 27, 2005, EPA Region 4 issued to the Company a Notice of Violation (NOV) and Compliance Evaluation Inspection Report. The NOV and Compliance Evaluation Inspection Report alleged a number of violations of RCRA, including violations relating to recordkeeping, the failure to properly make hazardous waste determinations as required by RCRA, and alleged treatment of sulfuric acid waste without a permit. The most significant allegation in the NOV is that the Plant City facility’s reuse of phosphoric acid process water (which is otherwise exempt from regulation as a hazardous waste) in the production of ammoniated phosphate fertilizer, and the return of this process water to the facility’s process water recirculating system, have resulted in the disposal of hazardous waste into the system without a permit. The Compliance Evaluation Inspection Report indicates that as a result, the entire process water system, including all pipes, ditches, cooling ponds and gypsum stacks, could be regulated as hazardous waste management units under RCRA.

Several of our competitors have received NOVs making this same allegation. This particular recycling of process water is common in the industry and, the Company believes, was authorized by the EPA in 1990. The Company also believes that this allegation is inconsistent with recent case law governing the scope of the EPA’s regulatory authority under RCRA. If the EPA’s position is eventually upheld, the Company could incur material expenditures in order to modify its practices, or it may be required to comply with regulations applicable to hazardous waste treatment, storage or disposal facilities. If the Company is required to comply with such obligations, it could incur material capital and operating expenditures or may

24




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

be required to cease operation of the water recirculating system if it is determined that it does not meet RCRA standards. This would cause a significant disruption of the operations of the Plant City facility.

The NOV indicated that the Company is liable for penalties up to the statutory maximum (for example, the statutory maximum per day of noncompliance for each violation that occurred after March 15, 2004 is $32,500 per day). Although penalties of this magnitude are rarely, if ever, imposed, the Company is at risk of incurring substantial civil penalties with respect to these allegations. The EPA has referred this matter to the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) for enforcement. The Company has entered into discussions with the DOJ that have included not only the issues identified in the NOV but other operational practices of the Company and its competitors. The Company does not know if this matter will be resolved prior to the commencement of litigation by the United States.

In connection with the RCRA enforcement initiative, the EPA collected samples of soil, groundwater and various waste streams at the Plant City facility. The analysis of the split samples collected by the Company during the EPA’s inspection did not identify hazardous waste disposal issues impacting the site. The EPA’s sampling results appear to be consistent with the Company’s results. Pursuant to a 1992 consent order with the State of Florida, the Company captures and reuses groundwater that has been impacted as a result of the former operation of an unlined gypsum stack at the site. Although the Company believes that it has evaluated and is remediating the impacts resulting from its historic activities, the DOJ and the EPA have indicated that they will be seeking additional environmental investigation at the facilities subject to the enforcement initiative, including Plant City. In addition, we understand that the EPA may decide to inspect our Bartow, Florida property, where we formerly manufactured phosphoric acid. The EPA has requested and the Company has provided copies of existing monitoring data for this facility. Depending on the conclusions that the EPA reaches after reviewing this data, the EPA may require that an investigation of environmental conditions be undertaken at the Bartow facility.

Item 4.                Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders.

None.

25




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Part II

Item 5.                Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

The common shares of CF Industries Holdings, Inc. began trading on the New York Stock Exchange, Inc. (NYSE) under the symbol “CF” on August 11, 2005. Quarterly high and low sales prices, as reported by the NYSE, are provided below:

 

 

Sales Prices

 

Dividends

 

2006

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

per Share

 

First Quarter

 

$

19.19

 

$

15.10

 

 

$

0.02

 

 

Second Quarter

 

18.75

 

13.22

 

 

0.02

 

 

Third Quarter

 

17.32

 

12.91

 

 

0.02

 

 

Fourth Quarter

 

26.60

 

17.20

 

 

0.02

 

 

 

 

 

Sales Prices

 

Dividends

 

2005

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

per Share

 

Third Quarter (1)

 

$

18.00

 

$

14.48

 

 

$

 

 

Fourth Quarter

 

15.99

 

11.19

 

 

0.02

 

 


(1)                From August 11, 2005 through September 30, 2006.

As of February 8, 2007, there were approximately 3,594 stockholders of record.

We expect to pay quarterly cash dividends on our common stock at an annual rate of at least $0.08 per share for the foreseeable future. The declaration and payment of dividends to holders of our common stock is at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on many factors, including general economic and business conditions, our strategic plans, our financial results and condition, legal requirements and other factors as our board of directors deems relevant. Our ability to pay dividends on our common stock is limited under the terms of our senior secured revolving credit facility. Pursuant to the terms of this agreement, dividends are a type of restricted payment that may be limited based on certain levels of cash availability as defined in the agreement. For additional information about our senior secured credit facility, see Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data., Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, Note 21—Long-Term Debt, Credit Agreement and Notes Payable.

Item 6.                Selected Financial Data.

The following selected historical financial data as of December 31, 2006 and 2005 and for the years ended December 31, 2006, 2005 and 2004 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this Form 10-K. The following selected historical financial data as of December 31, 2004, 2003 and 2002 and for the years ended December 31, 2003 and 2002 have been derived from our consolidated financial statements, which are not included in this Form 10-K.

26




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

The selected historical financial data should be read in conjunction with the information contained in Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

 

Years ended December 31,

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

 

 

(in millions, except per share amounts)

 

Statement of Operations Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

1,949.5

 

$

1,908.4

 

$

1,650.7

 

$

1,369.9

 

$

1,014.1

 

Cost of sales

 

1,802.3

 

1,699.2

 

1,434.6

 

1,335.5

 

986.3

 

Gross margin

 

147.2

 

209.2

 

216.1

 

34.4

 

27.8

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

54.5

 

57.0

 

41.8

 

38.4

 

37.3

 

Other operating—net

 

21.4

 

14.1

 

25.1

 

1.6

 

9.3

 

Operating earnings (loss)

 

71.3

 

138.1

 

149.2

 

(5.6

)

(18.8

)

Interest expense (income)—net

 

(9.6

)

(0.6

)

16.8

 

21.6

 

21.4

 

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

28.3

 

 

 

 

Minority interest

 

28.8

 

17.8

 

23.1

 

6.0

 

6.4

 

Impairment of investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries (1)

 

 

 

1.1

 

 

 

Other non-operating—net

 

(0.9

)

0.1

 

(0.8

)

(0.6

)

(0.2

)

Earnings (loss) before income taxes, equity in earnings of unconsolidated subsidiaries and cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle

 

53.0

 

92.5

 

109.0

 

(32.6

)

(46.4

)

Income tax provision (benefit) (2)

 

19.7

 

128.7

 

41.4

 

(12.6

)

(16.6

)

Equity in earnings of unconsolidated subsidiaries—net of taxes

 

 

 

0.1

 

1.6

 

1.7

 

Cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle—net of taxes (3)

 

 

(2.8

)

 

 

 

Net earnings (loss)

 

$

33.3

 

$

(39.0

)

$

67.7

 

$

(18.4

)

$

(28.1

)

Cash dividends declared per common share

 

$

0.08

 

$

0.02

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August 17, 2005

 

 

 

through

 

 

 

December 31, 2005

 

 

 

(in millions, except per share amounts)

 

Post-Initial Public Offering (IPO) Information

 

 

 

 

 

Net Loss and Loss Per Share:

 

 

 

 

 

Loss before cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle

 

 

$

(109.5

)

 

Cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle—net of taxes

 

 

(2.8

)

 

Post-IPO net loss

 

 

$

(112.3

)

 

Basic and diluted weighted average common shares outstanding

 

 

55.0

 

 

Basic and diluted net loss per share:

 

 

 

 

 

Loss before cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle

 

 

$

(1.99

)

 

Cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle—net of taxes

 

 

(0.05

)

 

Post-IPO net loss

 

 

$

(2.04

)

 

 

27




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

 

 

 

Years ended December 31,

 

 

 

Actual

 

Pro forma (4)

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

 

 

(in millions, except per share amounts)

 

Share and per share data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic weighted average common shares outstanding

 

55.0

 

 

55.0

 

 

55.0

 

55.0

 

55.0

 

Diluted weighted average common shares outstanding

 

55.1

 

 

55.0

 

 

55.0

 

55.0

 

55.0

 

Basic and diluted net earnings (loss) per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earnings (loss) before cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle

 

$

0.60

 

 

$

(0.66

)

 

$

1.23

 

$

(0.33

)

$

(0.51

)

Cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle—net of taxes

 

 

 

(0.05

)

 

 

 

 

Net earnings (loss)

 

$

0.60

 

 

$

(0.71

)

 

$

1.23

 

$

(0.33

)

$

(0.51

)

 

 

 

Years ended December 31,

 

 

 

2006

 

 

2005

 

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

 

 

(in millions)

 

Other Financial Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation, depletion and amortization

 

$

94.6

 

 

$

97.5

 

 

$

108.6

 

$

105.0

 

$

108.5

 

Capital expenditures—net

 

59.3

 

 

69.4

 

 

33.7

 

28.7

 

26.3

 

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

 

2006

 

 

2005

 

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

 

 

(in millions)

 

Balance Sheet Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

25.4

 

 

$

37.4

 

 

$

50.0

 

$

77.2

 

$

56.5

 

Short-term investments (5)

 

300.2

 

 

179.3

 

 

369.3

 

91.7

 

38.4

 

Total assets

 

1,290.4

 

 

1,228.1

 

 

1,556.7

 

1,415.6

 

1,321.7

 

Customer advances

 

102.7

 

 

131.6

 

 

211.5

 

166.0

 

40.0

 

Total debt

 

4.2

 

 

4.2

 

 

258.8

 

293.5

 

326.2

 

Stockholders’ equity

 

767.0

 

 

755.9

 

 

787.3

 

733.5

 

740.9

 


(1)                In 2004, we recorded an impairment of investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries for the write-off of the carrying value of our investment in Big Bend Transfer Co., L.L.C.

(2)                In 2005, the income tax provision includes a non-cash charge of $99.9 million to establish a valuation allowance against net operating loss carryforwards generated when we operated as a cooperative.

(3)                The cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle in 2005 represents the adoption of FASB Interpretation (FIN) No. 47—Accounting for Conditional Asset Retirement Obligations.

(4)                Represents the pro forma basic and diluted net earnings (loss) per share calculations as if the weighted average number of shares issued in the initial public offering were outstanding as of the beginning of the earliest period presented. See Note 4 to our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, for further information regarding pro forma net earnings (loss) per share.

(5)                Short-term investments include available-for-sale auction rate securities.

28




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Item 7.                Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

You should read the following discussion and analysis in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes included in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. All references to “CF Holdings,” “we,” “us” and “our” refer to CF Industries Holdings, Inc. and its subsidiaries, including CF Industries, Inc. except where the context makes clear that the reference is only to CF Holdings itself and not its subsidiaries. All references to “our pre-IPO owners” refer to the eight stockholders of CF Industries, Inc. prior to the completion of our initial public offering and reorganization transaction on August 16, 2005.

Overview

Our Company

We are one of the largest manufacturers and distributors of nitrogen and phosphate fertilizer products in North America. Our operations are organized into two business segments: the nitrogen fertilizer business and the phosphate fertilizer business. Our principal products in the nitrogen fertilizer business are ammonia, urea and urea ammonium nitrate solution, or UAN. Our principal products in the phosphate fertilizer business are diammonium phosphate, or DAP, and monoammonium phosphate, or MAP. For the twelve months ended June 30, 2005, the most recent period for which such information is available, we supplied approximately 24% of the nitrogen and approximately 12% of the phosphate used in agricultural fertilizer applications in the United States. Our core market and distribution facilities are concentrated in the midwestern U.S. grain-producing states.

Our principal assets include:

·       the largest nitrogen fertilizer complex in North America (Donaldsonville, Louisiana);

·       a 66% economic interest in the largest nitrogen fertilizer complex in Canada (which we operate in Medicine Hat, Alberta, through Canadian Fertilizers Limited, or CFL, a consolidated variable interest entity);

·       one of the largest integrated ammonium phosphate fertilizer complexes in the United States (Plant City, Florida);

·       the most-recently constructed phosphate rock mine and associated beneficiation plant in the United States (Hardee County, Florida); and

·       an extensive system of terminals, warehouses and associated transportation equipment located primarily in the midwestern United States.

Company History

We were founded in 1946 as a fertilizer brokerage operation by a group of regional agricultural cooperatives seeking to pool their purchasing power. During the 1960s, we expanded our distribution capabilities and diversified into fertilizer manufacturing through the acquisition of several existing plants and facilities. During the 1970s and again during the 1990s, we expanded our production and distribution capabilities significantly, spending approximately $1 billion in each of these decades.

Through the end of 2002, we operated as a traditional supply cooperative. Our focus was on providing our pre-IPO owners with an assured supply of fertilizer. Typically, over 80% of our annual sales volume was to our pre-IPO owners. Though important, financial performance was subordinate to our mandated supply objective.

29




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

In 2002, we reassessed our corporate mission and adopted a new business model that established financial performance, rather than assured supply to our pre-IPO owners, as our principal objective. A critical aspect of the new business model was to establish a more economically driven approach to the marketplace. Under the new business model, we began to pursue markets and customers and make pricing decisions with a primary focus on financial performance. One result of this approach was a substantial shift in our customer mix. By 2006, our sales to customers other than our pre-IPO owners and Western Co-operative Fertilizers Limited (Westco), our joint venture partner in CFL, reached approximately 46% of our total sales volume for the year, which was more than double the comparable percentage for 2002.

CF Holdings was formed as a Delaware corporation in April 2005 to hold the existing businesses of CF Industries, Inc. In August of 2005, we completed our initial public offering of common stock.

Executive Summary

·       We reported net earnings of $33.3 million in 2006 compared to a net loss of $39.0 million in 2005. Our results for 2006 included a net $30.7 million pre-tax mark-to-market loss on natural gas derivatives and a pre-tax charge of $21.6 million for adjustments to our asset retirement obligations (AROs) and demolition costs primarily related to our closed Bartow, Florida complex. The net loss of $39.0 million in 2005 included a $99.9 million charge to the income tax provision to record a valuation allowance on the deferred tax asset related to CF Industries, Inc.’s net operating loss carryforwards generated during pre-IPO operations, a $28.3 million loss on the extinguishment of debt, a net $9.3 million pre-tax mark-to-market loss on natural gas derivatives and a $12.8 million pre-tax charge to AROs primarily related to our Bartow, Florida complex.

·       Our gross margin decreased $62.0 million to $147.2 million in 2006 compared to $209.2 million in 2005. The decline in gross margin resulted primarily from unfavorable variances related to natural gas costs and higher phosphate raw material costs, partially offset by higher average selling prices for ammonia as well as higher average phosphate fertilizer selling prices.

·       Our net sales were $1.9 billion for both 2006 and 2005. Higher average selling prices for ammonia and phosphate fertilizers in 2006 were offset by lower nitrogen fertilizer sales volumes. Our total sales volume of 8.4 million tons for 2006 approximated the volume of tons sold in 2005.

·       We paid cash dividends of $4.4 million in 2006.

The following significant items affected the comparability of our reported results for 2006 and our financial position as of December 31, 2006:

On August 16, 2005, we completed our IPO of common stock. We sold 47,437,500 shares of our common stock in the offering and received net proceeds, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions, of approximately $715.4 million. We did not retain any of the proceeds from our IPO. In connection with our IPO, we consummated a reorganization transaction in which CF Industries, Inc. ceased to be a cooperative and became our wholly-owned subsidiary. In the reorganization transaction, all of the equity interests in CF Industries, Inc. were cancelled in exchange for all of the proceeds of the IPO and 7,562,499 shares of our common stock.

In connection with our IPO, we also recorded a charge to the income tax provision of $99.9 million to reduce to zero what remained of the gross deferred tax asset related to CF Industries, Inc.’s net operating loss carryforwards as of August 16, 2005 (CF Industries, Inc.’s last day as a cooperative). Those net operating loss carryforwards were generated from business conducted with CF Industries, Inc.’s pre-IPO owners while CF Industries, Inc. was a cooperative. In connection with our IPO, we entered into an NOL agreement with the pre-IPO owners of CF Industries, Inc. which provides that in the event that it is finally determined by the applicable taxing jurisdictions that CF Industries, Inc.’s pre-IPO NOLs can be utilized,

30




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

we will pay the pre-IPO owners an amount equal to the federal and state income taxes saved by the utilization of the pre-IPO NOLs. See Notes 12 and 30 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, for further discussion of the NOL agreement.

In August of 2005, we replaced our $140 million senior secured revolving credit facility with a $250 million senior secured revolving credit facility.

In August of 2005, we repaid in full $235.6 million of our term notes, plus associated prepayment penalties and accrued interest in the amount of $29.3 million, with cash on hand and by liquidating short-term investments. Prior thereto, we made principal payments of $0.7 million and $10.0 million on their scheduled maturity dates.

In connection with these transactions, we incurred a net $17.1 million charge (after taxes) related to the prepayment penalties associated with the repayment of our long term debt ($16.0 million) and termination of a long-term incentive plan ($1.1 million) upon completion of our IPO. We also incurred a non-cash charge of $1.1 million (after taxes) related to the write-off of unamortized financing fees related to our previous senior secured revolving credit facility and long term debt.

Also, in connection with our IPO, our board of directors adopted a plan under which we grant stock-based awards to our officers, employees and non-employee directors. In both 2006 and 2005 (in connection with the IPO), stock—based awards were granted under this plan. In the third quarter of 2005, we adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 123R—Share-Based Payment which requires us to recognize in our consolidated statement of operations the grant date fair value of all stock-based awards. As a result, the total stock-based compensation cost recognized for 2006 and 2005 was $8.1 million and $3.7 million, respectively. Most of the stock-based compensation cost was recorded as selling, general and administrative expenses. We did not have stock-based awards prior to our initial public offering. See the “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” section later in this discussion and analysis for additional information on stock-based compensation.

Hurricane activity in the Gulf of Mexico region during the latter portion of 2005 significantly affected the domestic fertilizer industry. These hurricanes caused substantial damage to the natural gas production and distribution facilities in the region, affecting the supply and price of natural gas, the primary raw material used to produce nitrogen fertilizers. By the end of the first quarter of 2006, natural gas prices had moderated, returning to approximately pre-hurricane levels. These storms also affected the availability of barges used to transport urea and DAP/MAP on the Mississippi River and adversely affected the supply of sulfur, a raw material used in the production of phosphate fertilizers, by causing refinery closures and transportation disruptions.

In the fourth quarter of 2005, we ceased classifying natural gas derivatives as cash flow hedges as defined in SFAS No. 133—Accounting for Derivatives and Hedging Activities. As a result, realized and unrealized gains or losses related to our derivatives are now recognized in operations as they occur. Cash flow hedges existing at the time we discontinued hedge accounting were de-designated as cash flow hedges. During 2006, we recognized a net $30.7 million pre-tax mark-to-market loss on natural gas derivatives in cost of sales compared to a net $9.3 million pre-tax mark-to-market loss in 2005. Despite our change in accounting treatment, the execution and attendant economic consequences of our hedging activities have not changed, in that derivatives are still being used to lock in a substantial portion of our margin on forward pricing program (FPP) sales. However, because of our change in accounting treatment, gains or losses on natural gas hedges may not be realized in the same period as the FPP sale to which they relate. We also establish natural gas derivative positions that are associated with anticipated natural gas requirements unrelated to our FPP. See Note 24 to our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, for further discussion of derivative financial instruments.

31




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

We implemented Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Interpretation No. 47—Accounting for Conditional Asset Retirement Obligations (FIN No. 47) in the fourth quarter of 2005. This interpretation of SFAS No. 143—Accounting for Asset Retirement Obligations requires us to recognize a liability for asset retirement obligations (AROs) associated with our facilities at the time those obligations are imposed, even if the timing and manner of settlement are difficult to ascertain. We identified conditional AROs for costs associated with the cessation of operations at our facilities. Consequently, we recognized an increase in ARO liabilities of $4.6 million, and an increase in deferred tax assets of $1.8 million resulting in a cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle of $2.8 million that decreased net earnings. See Note 9 to our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, for further discussion of asset retirement obligations.

Key Industry Factors

We operate in a highly competitive, global industry. Our products are globally-traded commodities and, as a result, we compete principally on the basis of delivered price and to a lesser extent on customer service and product quality. Moreover, our operating results are influenced by a broad range of factors, including those outlined below.

Global Supply & Demand

Historically, global fertilizer demand has been driven primarily by population growth, changes in dietary habits and planted acreage and application rates, among other things. We expect these key variables to continue to have major impacts on long-term fertilizer demand for the foreseeable future. Short-term fertilizer demand depends on global economic conditions, weather patterns, the level of global grain stocks relative to consumption and farm sector income. Other geopolitical factors like temporary disruptions in fertilizer trade related to government intervention or changes in the buying patterns of key consuming countries such as China, India or Brazil often play a major role in shaping near-term market fundamentals. The economics of fertilizer manufacturing play a key role in decisions to increase or reduce capacity. Supply of fertilizers is generally driven by available capacity and operating rates, raw material costs, government policies and global trade.

Natural Gas Prices

Natural gas is the most significant raw material required in the production of nitrogen fertilizers. For example, in 2006, our natural gas purchases accounted for approximately 54% of our total cost of sales for nitrogen fertilizers. North American natural gas prices have increased substantially and, since 1999, have become significantly more volatile. In 2005, North American natural gas prices reached unprecedented levels due to the impact Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita had on an already tight natural gas market. By the end of the first quarter of 2006, natural gas prices moderated, returning to pre-hurricane levels. Our competitive position, on a worldwide basis, has been negatively impacted by the higher price of North American natural gas relative to the gas prices available to fertilizer producers in other regions of the world.

Farmers’ Economics

The demand for fertilizer is affected by the aggregate crop planting decisions and fertilizer application rate decisions of individual farmers. Individual farmers make planting decisions based largely on prospective profitability of a harvest, while the specific varieties and amounts of fertilizer they apply depend on factors like their current liquidity, soil conditions, weather patterns and the types of crops planted. Fertilizer demand is expected to increase in the future in response to increased corn acreage required to support the growing ethanol industry.

32




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Global Trade in Fertilizer

In addition to the relationship between global supply and demand, profitability within a particular geographic region is determined by the supply/demand balance within that region. Regional supply and demand can be influenced significantly by factors affecting trade within regions. Some of these factors include the relative cost to produce and deliver product, relative currency values and governmental policies affecting trade and other matters. Changes in currency values alter our cost competitiveness relative to producers in other regions of the world.

Imports account for a significant portion of the nitrogen fertilizer consumed in North America. Producers of nitrogen-based fertilizers located in the Middle East, the former Soviet Union, the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago and Venezuela are major exporters to North America.

The domestic phosphate fertilizer industry is tied to the global market through its position as the world’s largest exporter of DAP/MAP. Historically, China has been a major source of demand for the U.S. phosphate fertilizer industry. China’s reliance on imported phosphate fertilizers has decreased over the last three years as a matter of Chinese government policy to achieve self sufficiency in these products. However, growth in demand in other international markets, including Latin America, India and Pakistan, has partially offset declining imports by China.

Political and Social Government Policies

The political and social policies of governments around the world can result in the restriction of imports, the subsidization of domestic producers and/or the subsidization of exports. Due to the critical role that fertilizers play in food production, the construction and operation of fertilizer plants often are influenced by these political and social objectives.

Factors Affecting Our Results

Net Sales.   Our net sales are derived from the sale of nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers and are determined by the quantities of nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers we sell and the selling prices we realize. The volumes, mix and selling prices we realize are determined to a great extent by a combination of global and regional supply and demand factors.

Cost of Sales.   Our cost of sales includes manufacturing costs, product purchases and distribution costs. Manufacturing costs, the most significant element of cost of sales, consist primarily of raw materials, maintenance, direct labor and other plant overhead expenses. Purchased product costs primarily include the cost to buy ammonia for use in our phosphate fertilizer business and the cost to purchase nitrogen fertilizers to augment or replace production at our facilities. Distribution costs include the cost of freight required to transport finished products from our plants to our distribution facilities and storage costs prior to final shipment to customers.

In mid-2003, we instituted a margin risk management approach utilizing our forward pricing program (FPP), which allows us to manage some of the risks created by the volatility of fertilizer prices and natural gas costs. Through our FPP, we offer our customers the opportunity to purchase product on a forward basis at prices and on delivery dates we propose. As our customers enter into forward nitrogen fertilizer purchase contracts with us, we lock in a substantial portion of the margin on these sales mainly by effectively fixing the cost of natural gas, the largest and most volatile component of our manufacturing cost, using natural gas derivative instruments. In the third quarter of 2005 and the first quarter of 2006, due to the increased volatility of natural gas prices, we fulfilled a significant amount of FPP orders with a combination of inventory on hand and product purchases rather than with manufactured product. See “—Forward Pricing Program.” As a result of fixing the selling prices of our products under our FPP, often

33




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

months in advance of their ultimate delivery to customers, our reported selling prices and margins may differ from market spot prices and margins available at the time of shipment.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses.   Our selling, general and administrative expenses mainly consist of salaries and other payroll-related costs for our executive, administrative, legal, financial and marketing functions, as well as certain taxes, insurance and professional service fees. Our selling, general and administrative expenses have increased as a result of the consummation of our IPO. These expenses include additional legal and corporate governance expenses, stock-based awards, salary and payroll-related costs for additional accounting staff, director compensation, exchange listing fees, transfer agent and stockholder-related fees and increased premiums for director and officer liability insurance coverage.

Other Operating—Net.   Other operating—net includes the costs associated with our closed Bartow phosphate facility and other costs that do not relate directly to our central operations. Bartow facility costs include provisions for phosphogypsum stack and cooling pond closure costs, water treatment costs and costs associated with the cessation of operations. The term “other costs” refers to amounts recorded for environmental remediation for other areas of our business, litigation expenses, gains and losses on the sale of fixed assets and impairment charges for goodwill.

Interest Expense.   Our interest expense includes the interest on our long-term debt and notes payable, annual fees on our senior secured revolving credit facility and amortization of the related fees required to execute financing agreements.

Interest Income.   Our interest income represents amounts earned on our cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments.

Minority Interest.   Amounts reported as minority interest represent the 34% minority interest in the net operating results of CFL, our consolidated Canadian joint venture. We own 49% of the voting common stock of CFL and 66% of CFL’s non-voting preferred stock. Two of our pre-IPO owners own 17% of CFL’s voting common stock, including GROWMARK which owns 9%. The remaining 34% of the voting common stock and non-voting preferred stock of CFL is held by Westco. We designate four members of CFL’s nine-member board of directors, which also has one member designated by each of our two pre-IPO owners that own an interest in CFL and three members designated by Westco.

We operate the Medicine Hat facility and purchase approximately 66% of the facility’s ammonia and urea production, pursuant to a management agreement and a product purchase agreement. Both the management agreement and the product purchase agreement can be terminated by either us or CFL upon a twelve-month notice. Westco has the right, but not the obligation, to purchase the remaining 34% of the facility’s ammonia and urea production under a similar product purchase agreement. To the extent that Westco does not purchase its 34% of the facility’s production, we are obligated to purchase any remaining amounts. Since 1995, however, Westco has purchased at least 34% of the facility’s production each year.

Under the product purchase agreements, both we and Westco pay the greater of operating cost or market price for purchases. However, the product purchase agreements also provide that CFL will distribute its net earnings to us and Westco annually based on the respective quantities of product purchased from CFL. The distributions to Westco are reported as financing activities in the consolidated statements of cash flows, as we consider these payments to be similar to dividends. Our product purchase agreement also requires us to advance funds to CFL in the event that CFL is unable to meet its debts as they become due. The amount of each advance would be at least 66% of the deficiency and would be more in any year in which we purchased more than 66% of Medicine Hat’s production. We and Westco currently manage CFL such that each party is responsible for its share of CFL’s fixed costs and that CFL ‘s production volume meets the parties’ combined requirements. The management agreement, the product

34




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

purchase agreements and any other agreements related to CFL are subject to change with the consent of both parties.

Impairment of Investments in Unconsolidated Subsidiaries.   Impairment of investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries represents the write-down of the carrying value of our investments in our joint ventures.

Income Taxes.   Upon the completion of our IPO, CF Industries, Inc. ceased to be a nonexempt cooperative for federal income tax purposes. On the date of our IPO, CF Industries, Inc. had a deferred tax asset related to net operating loss carryforwards (NOLs) generated from business conducted with CF Industries, Inc.’s pre-IPO owners. These net operating loss carryforwards totaled $250 million, with expirations ranging from 2021 through 2023. The income tax provision for the year ended December 31, 2005 includes a charge of $99.9 million to establish a 100% valuation allowance for the deferred tax asset related to these NOLs. The valuation allowance is required because there is substantial uncertainty under existing tax law whether any tax benefits from this deferred tax asset will be realized since CF Industries, Inc. is no longer a cooperative for federal income tax purposes.

In connection with the IPO, we entered into a net operating loss agreement with CF Industries, Inc.’s pre-IPO owners (NOL Agreement) relating to the future treatment of the pre-IPO NOLs. Under the NOL Agreement, if it is finally determined that CF Industries, Inc.’s net operating loss carryforwards can be utilized subsequent to the IPO, we will pay to CF Industries, Inc.’s pre-IPO owners an amount equal to the resulting federal and state income taxes actually saved.

CFL operates as a cooperative for Canadian income tax purposes and distributes all of its earnings as patronage dividends to its customers, including CF Industries, Inc. For Canadian income tax purposes, CFL is permitted to deduct an amount equal to the patronage dividends it distributes to its customers, provided that certain requirements are met. As a result, CFL records no income tax provision.

On May 13, 2005, the Canadian Income Tax Act was amended to disallow the deduction of certain patronage distributions paid after March 22, 2004 to non-arms-length persons. In the settlement of CFL’s audit for the tax years 1997 through 2000, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) agreed that CFL has operated at arms-length with CF Industries with respect to the deductibility of patronage payments to CF Industries for the 2004 taxation year, and the Company believes it has continued to operate on an arms-length basis.

Although CFL is not currently under audit by the Canadian tax authorities, CFL received a preliminary inquiry from the CRA in 2005, which questioned whether CFL’s past patronage distributions had met the requirements for full deductibility under Canadian income tax law. While CFL believes its distributions complied with applicable law, CFL could be subject to material Canadian income tax liabilities if its distributions were determined to fail to meet the requirements for deductibility under Canadian tax law.

Equity in Earnings of Unconsolidated Subsidiaries—Net of Taxes.   Equity in earnings of unconsolidated subsidiaries—net of taxes represents our share of the net earnings of the joint ventures in which we have an ownership interest.

35




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Results of Operations

The following tables present our consolidated results of operations:

 

 

Years ended December 31,

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

2006 v. 2005

 

2005 v. 2004

 

 

 

(in millions, except per share amounts)

 

Net sales

 

$

1,949.5

 

 

$

1,908.4

 

 

$

1,650.7

 

 

$

41.1

 

 

 

$

257.7

 

 

Cost of sales

 

1,802.3

 

 

1,699.2

 

 

1,434.6

 

 

103.1

 

 

 

264.6

 

 

Gross margin

 

147.2

 

 

209.2

 

 

216.1

 

 

(62.0

)

 

 

(6.9

)

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

54.5

 

 

57.0

 

 

41.8

 

 

(2.5

)

 

 

15.2

 

 

Other operating—net

 

21.4

 

 

14.1

 

 

25.1

 

 

7.3

 

 

 

(11.0

)

 

Operating earnings

 

71.3

 

 

138.1

 

 

149.2

 

 

(66.8

)

 

 

(11.1

)

 

Interest expense

 

2.9

 

 

14.0

 

 

22.7

 

 

(11.1

)

 

 

(8.7

)

 

Interest income

 

(12.5

)

 

(14.6

)

 

(5.9

)

 

2.1

 

 

 

(8.7

)

 

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

 

28.3

 

 

 

 

(28.3

)

 

 

28.3

 

 

Minority interest

 

28.8

 

 

17.8

 

 

23.1

 

 

11.0

 

 

 

(5.3

)

 

Impairment of investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries

 

 

 

 

 

1.1

 

 

 

 

 

(1.1

)

 

Other non-operating—net

 

(0.9

)

 

0.1

 

 

(0.8

)

 

(1.0

)

 

 

0.9

 

 

Earnings before income taxes, equity in earnings of unconsolidated subsidiaries and cumulative effect of a  change in accounting principle

 

53.0

 

 

92.5

 

 

109.0

 

 

(39.5

)

 

 

(16.5

)

 

Income tax provision

 

19.7

 

 

128.7

 

 

41.4

 

 

(109.0

)

 

 

87.3

 

 

Equity in earnings of unconsolidated subsidiaries—net of taxes

 

 

 

 

 

0.1

 

 

 

 

 

(0.1

)

 

Earnings (loss) before cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle

 

33.3

 

 

(36.2

)

 

67.7

 

 

69.5

 

 

 

(103.9

)

 

Cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle—net of taxes

 

 

 

(2.8

)

 

 

 

2.8

 

 

 

(2.8

)

 

Net earnings (loss)

 

$

33.3

 

 

$

(39.0

)

 

$

67.7

 

 

$

72.3

 

 

 

$

(106.7

)

 

 

 

 

Actual

 

Pro forma (1)

 

 

 

 

 

Earnings (Loss) Per Share

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted earnings (loss) per share before cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle

 

$

0.60

 

 

$

(0.66

)

 

$

1.23

 

 

$

1.26

 

 

 

$

(1.89

)

 

Cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle—net of taxes

 

 

 

(0.05

)

 

 

 

0.05

 

 

 

(0.05

)

 

Basic and diluted net earnings (loss) per share

 

$

0.60

 

 

$

(0.71

)

 

$

1.23

 

 

$

1.31

 

 

 

$

(1.94

)

 

Basic weighted average common shares outstanding

 

55.0

 

 

55.0

 

 

55.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted weighted average common shares outstanding

 

55.1

 

 

55.0

 

 

55.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


(1)                Represents the pro forma basic and diluted net earnings (loss) per share calculations as if the weighted average number of common shares issued in the initial public offering were outstanding as of the beginning of the earliest period presented. See Note 4 to our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data, for further information regarding pro forma net earnings (loss) per share.

36




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

2005 Post-Initial Public Offering (IPO) Information

 

 

August 17, 2005

 

 

 

through

 

 

 

December 31, 2005

 

 

 

(in millions, except

per share amounts)

 

Loss before cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle

 

 

$

(109.5

)

 

Cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle—net of taxes

 

 

(2.8

)

 

Net loss

 

 

$

(112.3

)

 

Basic and diluted weighted average common shares outstanding

 

 

55.0

 

 

Basic and diluted loss per share before cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle

 

 

$

(1.99

)

 

Cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle—net of taxes

 

 

(0.05

)

 

Basic and diluted net loss per share

 

 

$

(2.04

)

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2006 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2005

Consolidated Operating Results

In 2006, the domestic nitrogen fertilizer industry was characterized by adverse conditions early in the year remaining from the 2005 hurricane effects, more moderate conditions through the fall and strength late in the year fueled by lower natural gas prices, a tight international market and expectations of a strong planting season in the spring of 2007. The first half of 2006 was unfavorably impacted by high natural gas prices during the first quarter of the year and reduced demand during the spring planting season. Results during 2006 for our phosphate fertilizer business were affected positively by increased domestic demand and relatively balanced international supply/demand conditions. Our total gross margin decreased by approximately $62.0 million, or 30%, to $147.2 million for 2006 compared to a gross margin of $209.2 million for 2005. The net earnings of $33.3 million for 2006 included a pre-tax charge of $30.7 million for unrealized mark-to-market losses on natural gas derivatives and a pre-tax charge of $21.6 million for adjustments to AROs and demolition costs primarily related to our closed Bartow, Florida complex. The net loss of $39.0 million for 2005 included a $99.9 million charge to record a valuation allowance on the deferred tax asset related to CF Industries, Inc.’s net operating loss carryforwards generated during pre-IPO operations, a $28.3 million loss on the extinguishment of debt, a gain of approximately $14.0 million associated with the early termination of certain natural gas hedge positions, a pre-tax charge of $9.3 million for unrealized mark-to-market losses on natural gas derivatives, a pre-tax charge of $12.8 million for upward adjustments to AROs primarily related to our closed Bartow, Florida complex and a $6.1 million tax benefit from a refund of Canadian income taxes.

Net Sales

Our net sales were $1.9 billion for both 2006 and 2005. Higher average selling prices for ammonia and phosphate fertilizers in 2006 were offset by lower nitrogen fertilizer sales volumes. Our total sales volume of 8.4 million tons for 2006 approximated the volume sold in 2005. Nitrogen fertilizer sales volume decreased 119,000 tons, or 2%, to 6.3 million tons for 2006 compared to 6.4 million tons in 2005, due primarily to the cessation of production by U.S. Agri-Chemicals to whom we had sold ammonia previously. Our total level of phosphate fertilizer sales of 2.1 million tons for 2006 approximated the amount sold in 2005. Nitrogen and phosphate fertilizer prices for 2006 averaged 2% and 6% higher, respectively, than the prices for similar products in 2005.

Cost of Sales

Total cost of sales of our nitrogen fertilizers averaged $217 per ton for 2006 compared to $202 per ton in 2005, an increase of 7%, primarily due to higher natural gas costs and higher purchased product costs.

37




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Phosphate fertilizer cost of sales averaged $207 per ton for 2006 compared to $200 per ton in the prior year, an increase of 4%, mainly due to higher ammonia and sulfur costs.

During 2006, we sold approximately 3.0 million tons of fertilizer under our FPP, representing approximately 36% of our total fertilizer sales volume for the period. In 2005, we sold approximately 5.2 million tons of fertilizer under this program, representing approximately 62% of our total fertilizer sales volume for the period. The lower level of FPP sales volumes in 2006 reflected the hesitancy of our customers during the last half of 2005 and the first half of 2006 to make commitments during the uncertain fertilizer pricing environment prevalent during those periods.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

Selling, general and administrative expenses decreased 4% to $54.5 million in 2006 compared to $57.0 million in 2005. The year-over-year decrease in expense for 2006 resulted largely from the absence of expenses related to our August 2005 IPO, including expenses associated with the termination of a long-term incentive plan upon completion of our IPO. This decrease was partially offset by additional stock-based compensation expense and additional administrative expenses associated with being a publicly held company, both incurred in 2006.

Other Operating—Net

Other operating—net increased to $21.4 million in 2006 from $14.1 million in 2005. On an annual basis, we review all aspects of the closed Bartow complex with respect to asset retirement obligations (AROs) and other plant site closure related activities. As a result of our 2006 review, we have revised our estimates for water treatment and phosphogypsum stack system closure costs, as well as costs to close the Bartow plant site. Additional costs are expected to be incurred to treat water, mainly in 2007 and 2008, to accommodate closure of the cooling pond. Phosphogypsum stack system closure costs associated with the cooling channel are expected to increase due to additional closure work and higher costs for previously identified activities. We also expect to incur additional costs related to site closure activities, including closure of wastewater treatment systems as well as storm water management. Consequently, we recorded a charge of $14.9 million, primarily in the fourth quarter of 2006, to reflect these revised estimates. We also recorded a $3.3 million charge, again primarily in the fourth quarter of 2006, for additional planned demolition activities at Bartow. In 2005, $11.1 million of adjustments to Bartow phosphogypsum stack asset retirement costs were recorded as a result of revised engineering estimates prepared in connection with the preparation of a revised closure plan for the Plant City phosphogypsum stack and cooling pond system. For a detailed explanation of the accounting for AROs at Bartow, please refer to Note 9 of our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

Interest—Net

Net interest income increased to $9.6 million in 2006 from $0.6 million in 2005. Interest expense decreased 79% to $2.9 million in 2006 from $14.0 million in 2005, due to the full repayment of our term notes, out of our cash and short-term investments, in the third quarter of 2005. This decrease was partially offset by $1.0 million of interest expense in the second quarter of 2006 related to a Canadian tax matter. Interest income decreased to $12.5 million in 2006 from $14.6 million in 2005 as higher average rates of return were more than offset by lower average balances of invested cash.

Minority Interest

Amounts reported as minority interest represent the interest of the 34% minority holder of CFL’s common and preferred shares. The increase in 2006 was due to improved 2006 CFL operating results. The improvement in CFL operating results reflects stronger market conditions for nitrogen fertilizers produced in Canada.

38




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Income Taxes

Our income tax provision for 2006 was $19.7 million, or an effective tax rate of 37.2%. This compared with a tax provision of $128.7 million on pre-tax earnings for 2005. For 2005, the income tax provision of $128.7 million included the following items: income tax expense of $35.4 million on earnings before income taxes; a charge of $99.9 million to establish a valuation allowance, as previously discussed; a tax benefit of $0.5 million for adjustments to prior years’ tax returns; and a tax benefit related to a Canadian income tax refund of $6.1 million. Our effective tax rate (exclusive of the $99.9 million non-cash charge and the $6.1 million refund of Canadian income taxes) was 37.7%. The decrease in the effective tax rate on earnings before income taxes results principally from lower state income taxes.

Year Ended December 31, 2005 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2004

In 2005, the domestic nitrogen fertilizer industry, which benefited from tight global supply conditions through most of the year, was adversely impacted by rising natural gas prices in the third and fourth quarters of the year. The domestic phosphate fertilizer industry continued to show improvement due primarily to strong export demand earlier in 2005 and a tighter domestic supply/demand balance in the second half of the year due to hurricane-related production curtailments. Our total gross margin decreased by approximately $6.9 million, or 3%, to $209.2 million in 2005 from $216.1 million in 2004 due largely to deteriorating nitrogen fertilizer market conditions in the latter part of the year, partially offset by increased selling prices for phosphate fertilizers. The net loss of $39.0 million in 2005 included a $99.9 million charge to record a valuation allowance against the deferred tax asset related to our net operating loss carryforwards generated during our pre-IPO operations as a cooperative, a $6.1 million refund of Canadian income taxes, the cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle related to our accounting for conditional asset retirement obligations that reduced net earnings by $2.8 million, a $28.3 million loss on the early extinguishment of debt, a gain of approximately $14.0 million on our derivatives due to the early termination of hedge positions recognized in the third quarter, an increase of $11.1 million in Bartow phosphogypsum stack asset retirement obligations related to revised engineering cost estimates, and $9.3 million of unrealized mark-to-market losses on natural gas derivatives.

Net Sales

Our net sales increased 16% to $1.9 billion in 2005 compared to $1.7 billion in 2004, due to higher average selling prices and an increase in phosphate fertilizer sales volumes, partially offset by a decrease in nitrogen fertilizer sales volumes. Nitrogen fertilizer prices in 2005 averaged 19% higher than the prices for similar products in the comparable period of 2004 reflecting strong demand and tight supply. Phosphate fertilizer prices in 2005 were 10% higher than corresponding prices in 2004, resulting primarily from strong international demand during the first half of the year and tight domestic supply during the second half of 2005. Our total annual sales volume was 8.4 million tons in 2005 compared to 8.5 million tons in 2004, as a 109,000 ton increase in the volume of phosphate fertilizers sold in 2005 was more than offset by a 174,000 ton decrease in nitrogen fertilizer sales volume.

Cost of Sales

Total cost of sales of our nitrogen fertilizers averaged $202 per ton in 2005 compared to $164 per ton in 2004, an increase of 23%, primarily due to higher natural gas prices as well as higher purchased product costs. Phosphate fertilizer cost of sales averaged $200 per ton in 2005 compared to $187 per ton in the prior year, an increase of 7%, mainly due to higher phosphate rock and ammonia costs.

39




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased 36% to $57.0 million in 2005 compared to $41.8 million in 2004. The $15.2 million increase in 2005 was largely due to increased administrative expenses related to completion of our initial public offering ($6.5 million), our long-term incentive plan ($3.3 million), including expenses associated with the termination of the plan upon completion of our initial public offering, and compensation expense associated with our stock-based awards ($3.2 million).

Other Operating—Net

Other operating—net decreased to $14.1 million in 2005 from $25.1 million in 2004. The $11.0 million decrease was due primarily to a $4.6 million decrease in costs related to the Bartow facility in 2005 compared to 2004, $2.2 million of gains realized in 2005 on the sales of a previously idled distribution terminal and excess land at our Bartow complex, and a $3.4 million provision recorded in 2004 for environmental remediation requirements at our Ahoskie, North Carolina nitrogen facility, which has been closed for 23 years. An $11.8 million charge was recorded in the fourth quarter of 2004 for future expenditures to treat water at Bartow and other Bartow environmental remediation requirements. Prior to that time, Bartow water treatment costs were expensed as incurred. A decrease in recurring Bartow water treatment expense in 2005 was partially offset by $11.1 million of adjustments to Bartow phosphogypsum stack asset retirement obligations as a result of revised engineering cost estimates. The decrease in recurring Bartow water treatment expense in 2005 was due to the accounting treatment prior to the fourth quarter of 2004. For a detailed explanation of the accounting for water treatment costs at Bartow, please refer to Note 9 of our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

Interest—Net

Interest-net swung to $0.6 million of net interest income in 2005 from $16.8 million of net expense in 2004. Interest expense decreased 38% to $14.0 million in 2005 from $22.7 million in 2004, primarily due to lower average debt outstanding in 2005. The decrease in debt outstanding in 2005 was due to scheduled principal payments as well as the full repayment of our term notes. Interest income more than doubled to $14.6 million in 2005 from $5.9 million in 2004 as a result of higher average rates of return and, to a lesser extent, higher average balances of invested cash.

Loss on Extinguishment of Debt

The $28.3 million loss on extinguishment of debt in 2005 consists of a $26.4 million penalty associated with the prepayment of our term notes and the write-off of $1.9 million of unamortized financing fees related to our long-term debt and our previous senior secured revolving credit facility.

Minority Interest

Amounts reported as minority interest represent the interest of the 34% minority holder of CFL’s common and preferred shares. The decrease in 2005 was due to reduced CFL operating results. The deterioration in CFL operating results reflects weaker market conditions for nitrogen fertilizers, particularly in the latter half of 2005.

Income Taxes

Our income tax provision in 2005 included a non-cash charge of $99.9 million recorded in the third quarter, as previously discussed, a $6.1 million refund of Canadian income taxes received in the third quarter as well as the normal provision for income taxes on earnings. Our effective tax rate (exclusive of

40




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

the $99.9 million non-cash charge and the $6.1 million refund of Canadian income taxes) was approximately 38% in both 2005 and 2004. An increase in our 2005 effective tax rate due to the tax effect of expenses associated with our initial public offering, which are not deductible for income tax purposes, was offset by a tax benefit for adjustments for prior years’ tax returns.

Cumulative Effect of a Change in Accounting Principle—Net of Taxes

In the fourth quarter of 2005, we recorded additional asset retirement obligations due to implementation of FASB Interpretation (FIN) No. 47—Accounting for Conditional Asset Retirement Obligations and recorded a related charge for the cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle. The cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle reduced net earnings in 2005 by $2.8 million. For a discussion of the cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle, please see the “Overview” section of this discussion and analysis.

41




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Segment Review

Our business is organized and managed internally based on two segments, the nitrogen fertilizer business and the phosphate fertilizer business, which are differentiated primarily by their products, the markets they serve and the regulatory environments in which they operate.

Nitrogen Fertilizer Business

The following table presents summary operating data for our nitrogen fertilizer business:

 

 

Years ended December 31,

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

2006 v. 2005

 

2005 v. 2004

 

 

 

(in millions, except as noted)

 

Net sales

 

$

1,467.2

 

$

1,469.7

 

$

1,273.9

 

 

$

(2.5

)

 

 

$

195.8

 

 

Cost of sales

 

1,368.7

 

1,296.8

 

1,080.1

 

 

71.9

 

 

 

216.7

 

 

Gross margin

 

$

98.5

 

$

172.9

 

$

193.8

 

 

$

(74.4

)

 

 

$

(20.9

)

 

Gross margin percentage

 

6.7

%

11.8

%

15.2

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tons of product sold (000s)

 

6,310

 

6,429

 

6,603

 

 

(119

)

 

 

(174

)

 

Sales volume by product (000s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ammonia

 

1,226

 

1,382

 

1,438

 

 

(156

)

 

 

(56

)

 

Urea

 

2,619

 

2,518

 

2,513

 

 

101

 

 

 

5

 

 

UAN

 

2,420

 

2,483

 

2,593

 

 

(63

)

 

 

(110

)

 

Other nitrogen products

 

45

 

46

 

59

 

 

(1

)

 

 

(13

)

 

Average selling price per ton by product

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ammonia

 

$

361

 

$

316

 

$

278

 

 

$

45

 

 

 

$

38

 

 

Urea

 

244

 

249

 

205

 

 

(5

)

 

 

44

 

 

UAN

 

158

 

162

 

137

 

 

(4

)

 

 

25

 

 

Cost of natural gas (per MMBtu) (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Donaldsonville

 

$

7.20

 

$

7.12

 

$

5.60

 

 

$

0.08

 

 

 

$

1.52

 

 

Medicine Hat

 

6.56

 

6.83

 

5.10

 

 

(0.27

)

 

 

1.73

 

 

Average daily market price of natural gas (per MMBtu)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henry Hub (Louisiana)

 

$

6.74

 

$

8.86

 

$

5.85

 

 

$

(2.12

)

 

 

$

3.01

 

 

AECO (Alberta)

 

5.76

 

7.26

 

5.04

 

 

(1.50

)

 

 

2.22

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

$

59.2

 

$

63.0

 

$

71.4

 

 

$

(3.8

)

 

 

$

(8.4

)

 

Capital expenditures

 

$

25.9

 

$

44.4

 

$

13.8

 

 

$

(18.5

)

 

 

$

30.6

 

 

Production volume by product (000s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ammonia (2) (3)

 

3,158

 

2,778

 

3,356

 

 

380

 

 

 

(578

)

 

Granular urea (2)

 

2,334

 

2,065

 

2,322

 

 

269

 

 

 

(257

)

 

UAN (28%)

 

2,336

 

2,256

 

2,640

 

 

80

 

 

 

(384

)

 


(1)                Includes the cost of natural gas purchases and realized gains and losses on natural gas derivatives.

(2)                Total production at Donaldsonville and Medicine Hat, including the 34% interest of Westco, our joint venture partner in CFL.

(3)                Gross ammonia production, including amounts subsequently upgraded on-site into urea and/or UAN.

42




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Year Ended December 31, 2006 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2005

Net Sales.   Nitrogen fertilizer net sales were $1.5 billion for both 2006 and 2005, as higher average ammonia selling prices were, for the most part, offset by lower sales volume. Nitrogen fertilizer sales volume decreased 2% to 6.3 million tons in 2006 compared to 6.4 million tons in 2005. Ammonia and UAN sales volumes decreased by 11% and 3%, respectively, for 2006 compared to the prior year while urea sales volume increased by 4%. Ammonia sales volumes decreased due primarily to lower sales from our Tampa terminal due to U.S. Agri-Chemicals, a former customer, ceasing phosphate operations in 2005. Increases in industry consumption in the fall in anticipation of strong corn and wheat prices offset a spring during which the industry experienced fewer corn acres planted and reduced application rates. The decrease in UAN sales compared to sales for 2005 was due primarily to less corn acreage planted and reduced demand in the southern portion of the country due to drought conditions, both experienced during the first half of 2006. The impact of these factors was partially offset by strong summer and fall fill demand resulting from the anticipation of a stronger UAN market later in 2006 and into the spring of 2007. Ammonia sales prices increased by 14% for 2006 compared to the prior year, primarily due to tight world market conditions and strong fourth quarter domestic demand.

Cost of Sales.   Total cost of sales of our nitrogen fertilizers averaged $217 per ton for 2006, compared to $202 per ton for 2005, an increase of 7%, largely due to unfavorable variances related to natural gas derivatives and higher purchased product costs. While the overall weighted average cost of natural gas supplied to our Donaldsonville facility and CFL’s Medicine Hat facility decreased by 1% for 2006 versus the cost in 2005, the favorable effect of this variance was more than offset by the impact of the realized losses on natural gas derivatives immediately recognized in cost of sales. We recognized $30.7 million of unrealized mark-to-market losses on derivatives in 2006 compared to $9.3 million in 2005 due to our discontinuing hedge accounting in the last quarter of 2005, and the decline in natural gas prices that occurred during the respective periods. We also recorded approximately $14.0 million of hedge gains in 2005, mainly in the third quarter. The costs of finished fertilizer products purchased for resale were approximately $8.9 million higher in 2006 than in 2005 due to the overall increase in nitrogen fertilizer prices as well as an increase in the amount of sales volume supported by purchased products, both factors mainly occurring during the first six months of 2006. See the “Overview” section of this discussion and analysis for additional information about the impact of accounting for our natural gas derivatives.

During 2006, we sold approximately 2.7 million tons of nitrogen fertilizers under our FPP, representing approximately 44% of our nitrogen fertilizer sales volume for the period. In 2005, we sold approximately 4.5 million tons of nitrogen fertilizers under this program, representing approximately 70% of our nitrogen fertilizer sales volume for the period. The lower level of FPP sales volumes in 2006 reflected the hesitancy of our customers during the last half of 2005 and the first half of 2006 to make commitments during the uncertain fertilizer pricing environment prevalent during those respective periods.

Year Ended December 31, 2005 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2004

Net Sales.   Nitrogen fertilizer net sales increased 15% to $1.5 billion in 2005 compared to $1.3 billion in 2004, as higher average selling prices more than offset a decrease in sales volume. Ammonia, urea and UAN sales prices increased by 14%, 21% and 18%, respectively, in 2005 compared to the prior year. The increase in ammonia prices in the first half of 2005 was due to strong U.S. demand and tight supply conditions in midwestern U.S. markets. During the last half of 2005, the sharp increase in natural gas prices and the resulting drop in domestic production caused ammonia prices to increase. Urea prices increased in 2005 due to a tight world market caused by plant outages abroad, reduced domestic production resulting from higher natural gas prices and the impact of increased buying related to demand that had been deferred from previous periods. An improved overall nitrogen fertilizer market earlier in

43




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

2005, combined with tight supplies resulting from reduced domestic production later in the year because of higher natural gas prices, supported higher UAN selling prices in 2005. Our nitrogen fertilizer sales volume decreased 3% in 2005 to 6.4 million tons as compared to 6.6 million tons sold in 2004. Although both ammonia and UAN sales volumes decreased by 4% from 2004, urea sales volume was comparable to the prior year. The decrease in ammonia sales volume was primarily due to the loss of sales out of our Tampa, Florida terminal due to the loss of a key customer. UAN sales volume declined in 2005 due to reduced supply availability resulting from scheduled plant turnarounds and production and shipping disruptions caused by two hurricanes.

Cost of Sales.   Total cost of sales of nitrogen fertilizers averaged $202 per ton in 2005 compared to $164 per ton in 2004, an increase of 23%, largely due to higher natural gas prices, higher purchased product costs and unrealized mark-to-market losses, partially offset by the favorable impact of the early termination of certain natural gas hedge positions associated with our forward pricing program. The overall weighted average cost of natural gas supplied to our Donaldsonville and CFL’s Medicine Hat facilities increased by 29% in 2005 versus the cost in 2004, mainly due to continued tight market conditions for natural gas and the impact of the two gulf hurricanes. Purchased product costs were approximately $57.3 million higher in 2005 than in 2004, due to additional quantities purchased to meet sales commitments as well as the overall increase in nitrogen fertilizer prices previously discussed. As previously mentioned, we recognized as a reduction of cost of sales in the third quarter of 2005, a gain of approximately $14.0 million which arose from the early termination of FPP-related natural gas positions. We also recognized $9.3 million of unrealized mark-to-market losses on derivatives in the fourth quarter of 2005 as an increase in cost of sales due to our discontinuation of hedge accounting. See the “Overview” section of this discussion and analysis for additional information about the impact of accounting for our natural gas derivatives.

During 2005, we sold approximately 4.5 million tons of nitrogen fertilizer under our forward pricing program, representing approximately 70% of our nitrogen fertilizer sales volume. In 2004, we sold approximately 3.6 million tons of nitrogen fertilizers under this program, representing approximately 54% of our nitrogen fertilizer sales volume for the year.

44




CF INDUSTRIES HOLDINGS, INC.

Phosphate Fertilizer Business

The following table presents summary operating data for our phosphate fertilizer business:

 

 

Years ended December 31,

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

 

2004

 

2006 v. 2005

 

2005 v. 2004

 

 

 

(in millions, except as noted)

 

Net sales

 

$

482.3

 

$

438.7

 

$

376.8

 

 

$

43.6

 

 

 

$

61.9

 

 

Cost of sales

 

433.6

 

402.4

 

354.5

 

 

31.2

 

 

 

47.9

 

 

Gross margin