clb-10k_2010.htm


 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
________________
 
FORM 10-K
(Mark One)
   
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
   
¨
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010
   
 
OR
   
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
   
 
For the transition period from       ____________________ to   ____________________                                

Commission File Number 001-14273
CORE LABORATORIES N.V.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

The Netherlands
Not Applicable
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
Herengracht 424
 
1017 BZ Amsterdam
 
The Netherlands
Not Applicable
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
   
Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (31-20) 420-3191

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Name of exchange on which registered
Common Shares, EUR 0.02 Par Value Per Share
New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ý No ¨

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Exchange Act. Yes ¨ No ý

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes ý  No ¨

    Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes ý  No ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ý

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See definition of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer  ý
Accelerated filer  ¨
Non-accelerated filer  ¨
Smaller reporting company  ¨
   
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes ¨ No ý

As of June 30, 2010, the number of common shares outstanding was 44,675,908. At that date, the aggregate market value of common shares held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $3,167,283,939.

As of February 17, 2011, the number of common shares outstanding was 45,067,456.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

The information required by Part III of this Report, to the extent not set forth herein, is incorporated herein by reference from the registrant’s definitive proxy statement relating to the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held in 2011, which definitive proxy statement shall be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year to which this Report relates.

This document (excluding exhibits) contains 71 pages.
The table of contents is set forth on the following page. The exhibit index begins on page 31.

 


 
 

 

CORE LABORATORIES N.V.
FORM 10-K FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2010

TABLE OF CONTENTS

   
Page
     
PART I
PART II
PART III
PART IV

 
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PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

General

Core Laboratories N.V. is a Netherlands limited liability company.  We were established in 1936 and are one of the world's leading providers of proprietary and patented reservoir description, production enhancement and reservoir management services to the oil and gas industry. These products and services are directed toward enabling our clients to improve reservoir performance and increase oil and gas recovery from their producing fields. We have over 70 offices in more than 50 countries and have approximately 5,000 employees.

References to "Core Lab", the "Company", "we", "our", and similar phrases are used throughout this Annual Report on Form 10-K (this "Form 10-K") and relate collectively to Core Laboratories N.V. and its consolidated affiliates.

Business Strategy

Our business strategy is to provide advanced technologies that improve reservoir performance by (i) continuing the development of proprietary technologies through client-driven research and development, (ii) expanding the services and products offered throughout our global network of offices and (iii) acquiring complementary technologies that add key technologies or market presence and enhance existing products and services.

Development of New Technologies, Services and Products

We conduct research and development to meet the needs of our clients who are continually seeking new services and technologies to lower their costs of finding, developing and producing oil and gas. While the aggregate number of wells being drilled per year has fluctuated relative to market conditions, oil and gas producers have, on a proportional basis, increased expenditures on technology services to improve their understanding of the reservoir and increase production of oil and gas from their producing fields. We intend to continue concentrating our efforts on services and technologies that improve reservoir performance and increase oil and gas recovery.

International Expansion of Services and Products

Another component of our business strategy is to broaden the spectrum of services and products offered to our clients on a global basis. We intend to continue using our worldwide network of offices to offer many of our services and products that have been developed internally or obtained through acquisitions. This allows us to enhance our revenues through efficient utilization of our worldwide network.

Acquisitions

We continually review potential acquisitions to add key services and technologies, enhance market presence or complement existing businesses.

More information relating to our acquisitions is included in Note 3 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in this Form 10-K ("Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements").

Operations

We derive our revenues from services and product sales to clients primarily in the oil and gas industry.

Our reservoir optimization services and technologies are interrelated and are organized into three complementary segments. Disclosure relating to the operations and financial information of these business segments is included in Note 15 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

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Reservoir Description: Encompasses the characterization of petroleum reservoir rock, fluid and gas samples. We provide analytical and field services to characterize properties of crude oil and petroleum products to the oil and gas industry.
   
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Production Enhancement: Includes products and services relating to reservoir well completions, perforations, stimulations and production. We provide integrated services to evaluate the effectiveness of well completions and to develop solutions aimed at increasing the effectiveness of enhanced oil recovery projects.
   
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Reservoir Management: Combines and integrates information from reservoir description and production enhancement services to increase production and improve recovery of oil and gas from our clients' reservoirs.

We offer our services worldwide through our global network of offices. Services accounted for approximately 76%, 80% and 77% of our revenues from operations for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.

We manufacture products primarily in four facilities for distribution on a global basis. Product sales, generated principally in our Production Enhancement segment, accounted for approximately 24%, 20% and 23% of our revenues from operations for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.

Our product sales backlog at December 31, 2010 was approximately $26.0 million compared to $24.2 million at December 31, 2009. Sources of raw materials for our products are readily available and we expect that our current sales backlog at December 31, 2010 will be completed in 2011.

Reservoir Description

Commercial oil and gas fields consist of porous and permeable reservoir rocks that contain natural gas, crude oil and water. Due to the density differences of the fluids, natural gas typically caps the field and overlies an oil layer, which overlies the water. We provide services that characterize the porous reservoir rock and all three reservoir fluids. Services relating to these fluids include determining quality and measuring quantity of the fluids and their derived products.  This includes determining the value of different crude oil and natural gases by analyzing the individual components of complex hydrocarbons.  These data sets are used by oil companies to determine the most efficient method by which to recover, process and refine these hydrocarbons to produce the maximum value added to crude oil and natural gas.

We analyze samples of reservoir rocks for their porosity, which determines reservoir storage capacity, and for their permeability, which defines the ability of the fluids to flow through the rock. These measurements are used to determine how much oil and gas are present in a reservoir and the rates at which the oil and gas can be produced. We also use our proprietary services and technologies to correlate the reservoir description data to wireline logs and seismic data by determining the different acoustic velocities of reservoir rocks containing water, oil and natural gas. These measurements are used in conjunction with our reservoir management services to develop programs to produce more oil and gas from the reservoir.

Production Enhancement

We produce data to describe a reservoir system that is used to enhance oil and gas production so that it may exceed the average oilfield recovery factor, which is approximately 40%. Two production enhancement methods commonly used are (i) hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock to improve flow and (ii) flooding a reservoir with water, carbon dioxide, nitrogen or hydrocarbon gases to force more oil and gas to the wellbore. Many oilfields today are hydraulically fractured and flooded to maximize oil and gas recovery. Our services and technologies play a key role in the success of both methods.

The hydraulic fracturing of a producing formation is achieved by pumping a proppant material in a gel slurry into the reservoir zone at extremely high pressures. This forces fractures to open in the rock and "props" or holds the fractures open so that reservoir fluids can flow to the production wellbore.  Our data on rock type and strength are critical for determining the proper design of the hydraulic fracturing job. In addition, our testing indicates whether the gel slurry is compatible with the reservoir fluids so that damage does not occur to the porous rock network. Our proprietary and patented ZeroWash® tracer technology is used to determine that the proppant material was properly placed in the fracture to ensure effective flow and increased recovery.

SpectraChem® is another proprietary and patented technology developed for optimizing hydraulic fracture performance. SpectraChem® is used to aid operators in determining the efficiency of the fracture fluids used. SpectraChem® tracers allow operators to evaluate the quantity of fracture fluid that returns to the wellbore during the clean-up period after a hydraulic fracturing event.  This technology also allows our clients to evaluate load recovery, gas breakthrough, fluid leakoff and breaker efficiency, all of which are important factors for optimizing natural gas production after the formation is hydraulically fractured.

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Core’s patented and proprietary SpectraChem® fracture diagnostic service continued to evolve with the introduction of the SpectraChem® Plus+ service in early 2009.  The new SpectraChem® Plus+ service is effective in determining the effectiveness and efficiency of the hydraulic fracture stimulation of long multistage horizontal wells in gas-shale plays throughout North America.  SpectraChem® Plus+ data sets are used to determine how each frac stage, which may number up to 30 per well, is flowing.  Frac stages with ineffective flows may warrant further stimulation or remedial actions.  

We conduct dynamic flow tests of the reservoir fluids through the reservoir rock, at actual reservoir pressure and temperature, to realistically simulate the actual flooding of a producing zone. We use patented technologies, such as our Saturation Monitoring by the Attenuation of X-rays (SMAX™), to help design the enhanced recovery project. After a field flood is initiated, we are often involved in monitoring the progress of the flood to ensure the maximum amount of incremental production is being achieved through the use of our SpectraFloodTM technology, which we developed to optimize sweep efficiency during field floods.

Our unique completion monitoring system, Completion Profiler™, helps to determine flow rates from reservoir zones after they have been hydraulically fractured. This provides our clients with a baseline of early production information and can be compared to subsequent production logs later in the life of the well to see if and where hydrocarbon production varies.

Our PackScan™ patented technology, which is used as a tool to evaluate gravel pack effectiveness in an unconsolidated reservoir, has contributed to our revenue growth. PackScan™ measures the density changes in the area around the tool and is designed to observe the changes within the wellbore to verify the completeness of the gravel pack protection of the wellbore without any additional rig time.

In addition to our many patented reservoir analysis technologies, we have established ourselves as a global leader in the manufacture and distribution of high-performance perforating products. Our unique understanding of complex reservoirs supports our ability to supply perforating systems engineered to maximize well productivity by reducing, eliminating and overcoming formation damage caused during the completion of oil and gas wells. Our "systems" approach to the perforating of an oil or gas well has resulted in numerous patented products. Our HERO™ (High Efficiency Reservoir Optimization) and recently introduced SuperHERO™ and SuperHERO Plus+™ perforating systems have quickly become industry leaders in enhancing reservoir performance. The SuperHERO™ and SuperHERO Plus+™ perforating systems compliment our successful HERO™ line and are designed to optimize wellbore completions and stimulation programs in gas-shale reservoirs.  Evolved from our HERO™ charges, the SuperHERO™ and the SuperHERO Plus+™ charges use a proprietary and patented design of powdered metal liners and explosives technology that results in a deeper and cleaner perforating tunnel into the gas-shale reservoir.  This allows greater flow of hydrocarbons to the wellbore and helps to maximize hydrocarbon recovery from the reservoir.  Moreover, the deeper, near debris-free perforations enable lower fracture initiation pressures, reducing the amount of pressure-pumping horsepower required and its associated cost.  SuperHERO™ and SuperHERO Plus+™ charges can eliminate the ineffective perforations that would otherwise limit daily natural gas production and hinder the optimal fracture stimulation programs needed for prolific production from the Marcellus, Barnett, Fayetteville, Haynesville and similar gas-shale formations. Our manufacturing operations in the United States and Canada continue to meet the global demand for our perforating systems through facility expansion in addition to gains in efficiency and productivity.

Our Horizontal Time-Delayed Ballistics Actuated Sequential Transfer (HTD-BlastTM) perforating system is a technology useful for the effective and efficient perforation of extended-reach horizontal completions in the Bakken, Eagle Ford, and other shale formations.  The HTD-BlastTM perforating system can be deployed via coiled tubing, and it currently enables eight perforating events, beginning at the farthest reaches, or toe regions, of extended-reach horizontal wells.  The toe region is the most difficult section of an extended-reach well to effectively perforate and fracture stimulate.  The HTD-BlastTM system significantly improves the potential for production from those sections.  A proprietary, time-delayed detonating sequence allows the operator to position and perforate up to eight discrete zones.  This efficiency, coupled with Core’s effective SuperHERO Plus+™ perforating charges, results in superior perforations at a much reduced operating cost.  Superior perforations then allow effective fracture stimulation programs that can maximize production from extended horizontal wells.

We have experienced technical services personnel to support clients through our global network of offices for the everyday use of our perforating systems and the rapid introduction of new products. Our personnel are capable of providing client training and on-site service in the completion of oil and gas wells. Our patented X-SPAN™ and GTX-SPAN™ casing patches are supported by our technical services personnel.  These systems are capable of performing in high pressure gas environments and are used to seal non-productive reservoir zones from the producing wellbore.

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Reservoir Management

Reservoir description and production enhancement information, when applied across an entire oilfield, is used to maximize daily production and the ultimate total recovery from the reservoir. We are involved in numerous large-scale reservoir management projects, applying proprietary and state-of-the-art techniques from the earliest phases of a field development program until the last economic barrel of oil is recovered.

These projects are of increasing importance to oil companies as the incremental barrel is often the lowest cost and most profitable barrel in the reservoir. Producing incremental barrels increases our clients' cash flows which we believe will result in additional capital expenditures by our clients, and ultimately further opportunities for us.  We also develop and provide industry consortium studies to provide critical reservoir information to a broad spectrum of clients in a cost effective manner such as our multi-client regional reservoir optimization projects for both North America and international studies, especially studies pertaining to unconventional natural gas reservoirs such as our ongoing gas-shale studies entitled Reservoir Characterization and Production Properties of the
Haynesville and Bossier Shales in Louisiana and Texas, Marcellus Shale Study in the Appalachian Mountains, Reservoir Characterization and Production Properties of Gas Shales and a joint industry project evaluating the petrophysical, geochemical and production characteristics of the Eagle Ford Shale in South Texas. Additional studies being performed are our long running deep water Gulf of Mexico studies, a worldwide characterization of tight-gas sands, with special emphasis in the Middle East region, deepwater studies off the coasts of West Africa and Brazil, a study on the petroleum potential of offshore Vietnam and a Global Gas Shale Study that examines the gas shale potential in central and southern Europe, north Africa, India, China and Australia among other regions.

We sell and maintain permanent real time reservoir monitoring equipment that is installed in the reservoir for our oil and gas company clients which eliminates the need for down-hole electronic components providing increased reliability and high temperature capability in extreme operating environments.

Marketing and Sales

We market and sell our services and products through a combination of sales representatives, technical seminars, trade shows and print advertising. Direct sales and marketing are carried out by our sales force, technical experts and operating managers, as well as by sales representatives and distributors in various markets where we do not have offices.  Our Business Development group manages a Large Account Management Program to better serve our largest and most active clients by meeting with key personnel within their organizations to ensure the quality of our products and services are meeting their expectations and we are addressing any issues or needs in a timely manner.

Research and Development

The market for our products and services is characterized by changing technology and frequent product introduction. As a result, our success is dependent upon our ability to develop or acquire new products and services on a cost-effective basis and to introduce them into the marketplace in a timely manner. Many of our acquisitions have allowed us to obtain the benefits of the acquired company's research and development projects without the significant costs that would have been incurred if we had attempted to develop the products and services ourselves. We incur costs as part of internal research and development and these costs are charged to expense as incurred. We intend to continue committing financial resources and effort to the development and acquisition of new products and services. Over the years, we have made a number of technological advances, including the development of key technologies utilized in our operations. Substantially all of the new technologies have resulted from requests and guidance from our clients, particularly major oil companies.

Patents and Trademarks

We believe our patents, trademarks and other intellectual property rights are an important factor in maintaining our technological advantage, although no one patent is considered essential to our success. Typically, we will seek to protect our intellectual technology in all jurisdictions where we believe the cost of such protection is warranted. While we have patented some of our key technologies, we do not patent all of our proprietary technology even where regarded as patentable. In addition to patents, in many instances we protect our trade secrets through confidentiality agreements with our employees and our clients.

International Operations

We operate facilities in more than 50 countries. Our non-U.S. operations accounted for approximately 50%, 52% and 50% of our revenues from operations during the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.  Not included in the foregoing percentages are significant levels of our revenues recorded in the U.S. that are sourced from projects on foreign oilfields.

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While we are subject to fluctuations and changes in currency exchange rates relating to our international operations, we attempt to limit our exposure to foreign currency fluctuations by limiting the amount in which our foreign contracts are denominated in a currency other than the U.S. dollar to an amount generally equal to the expenses expected to be incurred in such foreign currency.   However, the ultimate decision as to the proportion of the foreign currency component within a contract usually resides with our clients.  Consequently, we are not always able to eliminate our foreign currency exposure.  We have not historically engaged in and are not currently engaged in any significant hedging or currency trading transactions designed to compensate for adverse currency fluctuations. The following graphs summarize our reported revenues by geographic region (in contrast to the location of the reservoirs) for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008:

Geographic Breakdown of Revenues

 
         
 
 
Environmental Regulation

We are subject to stringent governmental laws and regulations pertaining to protection of the environment and the manner in which chemicals and gases used in our analytical and manufacturing processes are handled and generated wastes are disposed.  Consistent with our quality assurance and control principles, we have established proactive environmental policies for the management of these chemicals and gases as well as the handling and recycling or disposal of wastes resulting from our operations.  Compliance with these laws and regulations may require the acquisition of permits for regulated activities, capital expenditures to limit or prevent emissions and discharges, and stringent restrictions for the handling and disposal of certain wastes.  Failure to comply with these laws and regulations may result in the assessment of administrative, civil and criminal penalties, the imposition of remedial obligations, and even the issuance of injunctive relief.  The trend in environmental regulation has been to place more restrictions and limitations on activities that may affect the environment and thus any changes in environmental laws and regulations that result in more stringent and costly waste handling, storage, transport, disposal or cleanup requirements could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial position.  For instance, the adoption of laws or implementation of regulations to address concerns about global climate change or threats to drinking water from hydraulic fracturing activities that have the effect of lowering the demand for carbon-based fuels could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our analytical and manufacturing processes involve the handling and use of numerous chemicals and gases as well as the generation of wastes.  Spills or releases of these chemicals, gases, and wastes at our facilities or at offsite locations where they are transported for recycling or disposal could subject us to environmental liability, which may be strict, joint and several, for the costs of cleaning up chemicals and wastes released into the environment and for damages to natural resources, and it is not uncommon for neighboring landowners and other third parties to file claims for personal injury and property damage allegedly caused by such spills or releases.  As a result of such actions, we could be required to remove previously disposed wastes, remediate environmental contamination, and undertake measures to prevent future contamination.  While we believe that we are in substantial compliance with current applicable environmental laws and regulations and that continued compliance with existing requirements will not have a material adverse impact on us, we cannot give any assurance as to the amount or timing of future expenditures for environmental compliance or remediation, and actual future expenditures may be different from the amounts we currently anticipate.

Competition

The businesses in which we engage are competitive. Some of our competitors are divisions or subsidiaries of companies that are larger and have greater financial and other resources than we have. While no one company competes with us in all of our product and service lines, we face competition in these lines, primarily from independent regional companies and internal divisions of major integrated oil and gas companies. We compete in different product and service lines to various degrees on the basis of price, technical

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performance, availability, quality and technical support. Our ability to compete successfully depends on elements both within and outside of our control, including successful and timely development of new products and services, performance and quality, client service, pricing, industry trends and general economic trends.

Reliance on the Oil and Gas Industry

Our business and operations are substantially dependent upon the condition of the global oil and gas industry. Future downturns in the oil and gas industry, or in the oilfield services business, may have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

The oil and gas industry is highly cyclical and has been subject to significant economic downturns at various times as a result of numerous factors affecting the supply of and demand for oil and natural gas, including the level of capital expenditures of the oil and gas industry; the level of drilling activity; the level of production activity; market prices of oil and gas; economic conditions existing in the world; interest rates and the cost of capital; environmental regulations; tax policies; political requirements of national governments; coordination by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries ("OPEC"); cost of producing oil and natural gas; and technological advances.

Employees

As of December 31, 2010, we had approximately 5,000 employees. We do not have any material collective bargaining agreements and consider relations with our employees to be good.

Web Site Access to Our Periodic SEC Reports

Our primary internet address is http://www.corelab.com. We file or furnish Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to those reports with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). These reports are available free of charge through our web site as soon as reasonably practicable after they are filed or furnished electronically with the SEC. We may from time to time provide important disclosures to investors by posting them in the investor relations section of our web site, as allowed by SEC rules.

Materials we file with the SEC may be read and copied at the SEC's Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Information on the operation of the Public Reference Room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC also maintains an internet website at http://www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding our company that we file electronically with the SEC.

NYSE Corporate Governance Matters

As a listed company with the New York Stock Exchange, our Chief Executive Officer, as required under Section 303A.12(a) of the NYSE Listed Company Manual, must certify to the NYSE each year whether or not he is aware of any violation by the company of NYSE Corporate Governance listing standards as of the date of the certification. On July 7, 2010, our Chief Executive Officer submitted such a certification to the NYSE which stated that he was not aware of any violation by Core Lab of the NYSE Corporate Governance listing standards. We will timely provide the annual certification of our Chief Executive Officer this year.  Included as Exhibits 31.1 and 31.2 to this Form 10-K are the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer Certifications required under Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

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ITEM 1A.  RISK FACTORS

Our forward-looking statements are based on assumptions that we believe to be reasonable but that may not prove to be accurate. All of our forward-looking information is, therefore, subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results expected. Although it is not possible to identify all factors, these risks and uncertainties include the risk factors discussed below.

Future downturns in the oil and gas industry, or in the oilfield services business, may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.

The oil and gas industry is highly cyclical and demand for the majority of our oilfield products and services is substantially dependent on the level of expenditures by the oil and gas industry for the exploration, development and production of crude oil and natural gas reserves, which are sensitive to oil and natural gas prices and generally dependent on the industry's view of future oil and gas prices.  There are numerous factors affecting the supply of and demand for our products and services, which include, but are not limited to:

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general and economic business conditions;
   
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market prices of oil and gas and expectations about future prices;
   
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cost of producing oil and natural gas;
   
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the level of drilling and production activity;
   
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mergers, consolidations and downsizing among our clients;
   
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coordination by OPEC;
   
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the impact of commodity prices on the expenditure levels of our clients;
   
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financial condition of our client base and their ability to fund capital expenditures;
   
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the physical effects of climatic change, including adverse weather or geologic/geophysical conditions;
   
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the adoption of legal requirements or taxation relating to climate change that lower the demand for petroleum-based fuels;
   
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civil unrest or political uncertainty in oil producing or consuming countries;
   
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level of consumption of oil, gas and petrochemicals by consumers;
   
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changes in existing laws, regulations, or other governmental actions;
   
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the business opportunities (or lack thereof) that may be presented to and pursued by us; and
   
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availability of services and materials for our clients to grow their capital expenditures.

The oil and gas industry has historically experienced periodic downturns, which have been characterized by diminished demand for our oilfield products and services and downward pressure on the prices we charge. A significant downturn in the oil and gas industry could result in a reduction in demand for oilfield services and could adversely affect our operating results.

We depend on the results of our international operations, which expose us to risks inherent in doing business abroad.

We conduct our business in over 50 countries; business outside of the United States accounted for approximately 50%, 52% and 50% of our revenues during the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Not included in the foregoing percentages are significant levels of our revenues recorded in the U.S. that are sourced from projects on foreign oilfields. Our operations are subject to the various laws and regulations of those respective countries as well as various risks peculiar to each country, which may include, but are not limited to:

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global economic conditions;
   
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political actions and requirements of national governments including trade restrictions, embargoes, seizure, detention, nationalization and expropriations of assets;
   
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interpretation of tax statutes and requirements of taxing authorities worldwide, routine examination by taxing authorities and assessment of additional taxes, penalties and/or interest;
   
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civil unrest;
   
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acts of terrorism;
   
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fluctuations and changes in currency exchange rates (see section below);
   
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the impact of inflation;
   
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difficulty in repatriating foreign currency received in excess of the local currency requirements; and
   
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current conditions in oil producing countries such as Venezuela, Nigeria, Iran and Iraq considering their potential impact on the world markets.

Historically, economic downturn and political events have resulted in lower demand for our products and services in certain markets. The ongoing conflict in Iraq and the potential for activity from terrorist groups that the U.S. government has cautioned against have further heightened our exposure to international risks.  The global economy is highly influenced by public confidence in the geopolitical environment and the situation in the Middle East continues to be highly fluid; therefore, we expect to experience heightened international risks.

Our results of operations may be significantly affected by foreign currency exchange rate risk.

We are exposed to risks due to fluctuations in currency exchange rates.  By the nature of our business, we derive a substantial amount of our revenues from our international operations, subjecting us to risks relating to fluctuations in currency exchange rates.  Our revenues and expenses are mainly denominated in U.S. dollar ("USD"), so fluctuations in the exchange rate of the USD against other currencies may in the future have an effect upon our results of operations.

Our results of operations may be adversely affected because our efforts to comply with U.S. laws such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the "FCPA") could restrict our ability to do business in foreign markets relative to our competitors who are not subject to U.S. law.

We operate in many parts of the world that have experienced governmental corruption to some degree and, in certain circumstances, strict compliance with anti-bribery laws may conflict with local customs and practices. We may be subject to competitive disadvantages to the extent that our competitors are able to secure business, licenses or other preferential treatment by making payments to government officials and others in positions of influence or through other methods that U.S. law and regulations prohibit us from using.

Because we are registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, we are subject to the regulations imposed by the FCPA, which generally prohibits us and our intermediaries from making improper payments to foreign officials for the purpose of obtaining or keeping business. In particular, we may be held liable for actions taken by our strategic or local partners even though our partners are not subject to the FCPA. Any such violations could result in substantial civil and/or criminal penalties and might adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition. In addition, our ability to continue to work in these parts of the world discussed above could be adversely affected if we were found to have violated certain U.S. laws, including the FCPA.

If we are not able to develop or acquire new products or our products become technologically obsolete, our results of operations may be adversely affected.

The market for our products and services is characterized by changing technology and frequent product introduction. As a result, our success is dependent upon our ability to develop or acquire new products and services on a cost-effective basis and to introduce them into the marketplace in a timely manner. While we intend to continue committing substantial financial resources and effort to the development of new products and services, we may not be able to successfully differentiate our products and services from those of our competitors. Our clients may not consider our proposed products and services to be of value to them; or if the proposed products

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and services are of a competitive nature, our clients may not view them as superior to our competitors' products and services. In addition, we may not be able to adapt to evolving markets and technologies, develop new products, or achieve and maintain technological advantages.

If we are unable to continue developing competitive products in a timely manner in response to changes in technology, our businesses and operating results may be materially and adversely affected. In addition, continuing development of new products inherently carries the risk of inventory obsolescence with respect to our older products.

If we are unable to obtain patents, licenses and other intellectual property rights covering our products and services, our operating results may be adversely affected.

Our success depends, in part, on our ability to obtain patents, licenses and other intellectual property rights covering our products and services. To that end, we have obtained certain patents and intend to continue to seek patents on some of our inventions and services. While we have patented some of our key technologies, we do not patent all of our proprietary technology, even when regarded as patentable. The process of seeking patent protection can be long and expensive. There can be no assurance that patents will be issued from currently pending or future applications or that, if patents are issued, they will be of sufficient scope or strength to provide meaningful protection or any commercial advantage to us. In addition, effective copyright and trade secret protection may be unavailable or limited in certain countries. Litigation, which could demand significant financial and management resources, may be necessary to enforce our patents or other intellectual property rights. Also, there can be no assurance that we can obtain licenses or other rights to necessary intellectual property on acceptable terms.

There are risks relating to our acquisition strategy.  If we are unable to successfully integrate and manage businesses that we have acquired and any businesses acquired in the future, our results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

One of our key business strategies is to acquire technologies, operations and assets that are complementary to our existing businesses. There are financial, operational and legal risks inherent in any acquisition strategy, including:

-
increased financial leverage;
   
-
ability to obtain additional financing;
   
-
increased interest expense; and
   
-
difficulties involved in combining disparate company cultures and facilities.

The success of any completed acquisition will depend on our ability to integrate effectively the acquired business into our existing operations. The process of integrating acquired businesses may involve unforeseen difficulties and may require a disproportionate amount of our managerial and financial resources. In addition, possible future acquisitions may be larger and for purchase prices significantly higher than those paid for earlier acquisitions. No assurance can be given that we will be able to continue to identify additional suitable acquisition opportunities, negotiate acceptable terms, obtain financing for acquisitions on acceptable terms or successfully acquire identified targets. Our failure to achieve consolidation savings, to incorporate the acquired businesses and assets
into our existing operations successfully or to minimize any unforeseen operational difficulties could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operation.

We are subject to a variety of environmental laws and regulations, which may result in increased costs and significant liability to our business.

We are subject to a variety of governmental laws and regulations both in the United States and abroad relating to protection of the environment and the use and storage of chemicals and gases used in our analytical and manufacturing processes and the discharge and disposal of wastes generated by those processes. These laws and regulations may impose joint and several, strict liability and failure to comply with such laws and regulations could result in the assessment of damages, fines and penalties, the imposition of remedial or corrective action obligations or the suspension or cessation of some or all of our operations. Stringent laws and regulations could require us to acquire permits or other authorizations to conduct regulated activities, install and maintain costly equipment and pollution control technologies, or to incur costs or liabilities to mitigate or remediate pollution conditions caused by our operations or attributable to former operators. If we fail to control the use, or adequately restrict the discharge of, hazardous substances or wastes, we could be subject to future material liabilities including remedial obligations. In addition, public interest in the protection of the environment has increased dramatically in recent years with governmental authorities imposing more stringent and restrictive requirements. We anticipate that the trend of more expansive and stricter environmental laws and regulations will continue, the occurrence of which may require us to increase our capital expenditures or could result in increased operating expenses.

9

 


For example, federal environmental legislation proposed in the recently concluded session of Congress and that could be re-introduced and adopted in the current session of Congress could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.  This legislation could include the following:

 
*
Climate Change.  Climate change legislation establishing a "cap-and-trade" plan for greenhouse gasses ("GHGs") was approved by the U.S. House of Representatives in the recently concluded session of Congress.  It is not possible at this time to predict whether or when the current session of Congress may act on climate change legislation.  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ("EPA") also has taken recent actions to monitor and report upon or otherwise restrict emissions of GHGs.  Based on recent developments, the EPA now purports to have a basis to restrict emissions of GHGs under existing federal Clean Air Act, effective January 2, 2011.  Adoption and implementation of laws and regulations limiting emissions of GHGs from our equipment or operations could require us to incur costs to comply with such requirements and also could adversely affect demand for the production of oil and natural gas and thus reduce demand for the services we provide to the oil and natural gas industry.
 
*
Hydraulic Fracturing.  The U.S. Congress considered legislation in the recently concluded session to amend the federal Safe Drinking Water Act to require the disclosure of chemicals used by the oil and natural gas industry in the hydraulic fracturing process.  Currently, regulation of hydraulic fracturing is primarily conducted at the state level through permitting and other compliance requirements.  It is not possible at this time to predict whether or when the current session of Congress may act on hydraulic fracturing legislation.  Any such legislation, if adopted, could establish an additional level of regulation and permitting at the federal level as well as require the disclosure of chemicals that are mixed with the water and sand pumped underground in the process, which disclosed information could be proprietary in nature and could be used by third parties opposing hydraulic fracturing to initiate legal proceedings alleging that specific chemicals used in the process adversely affect groundwater.  Even though Core Laboratories is not a hydraulic fracturing company, it does supply and analyze chemicals used during such processes for reservoir diagnostic purposes and could be adversely affected by such legislation.  In addition, the EPA has initiated a study of the potential environmental impacts of hydraulic fracturing, the results of which are anticipated to be available by late 2012, and the U.S. House of Representatives has commenced an investigation into hydraulic fracturing practices, which inquiries could result in the introduction of legislation restricting aspects of hydraulic fracturing.

We may be unable to attract and retain skilled and technically knowledgeable employees, which could adversely affect our business.

Our success depends upon attracting and retaining highly skilled professionals and other technical personnel. A number of our employees are highly skilled engineers, geologists and highly trained technicians, and our failure to continue to attract and retain such individuals could adversely affect our ability to compete in the oilfield services industry. We may confront significant and potentially adverse competition for these skilled and technically knowledgeable personnel, particularly during periods of increased demand for oil and gas. Additionally, at times there may be a shortage of skilled and technical personnel available in the market, potentially compounding the difficulty of attracting and retaining these employees. As a result, our business, results of operations and financial condition may be materially adversely affected.

We require a significant amount of cash to service our indebtedness, and our ability to generate cash will depend on many factors beyond our control.

Our ability to make payments on and to refinance our indebtedness, and to fund planned capital expenditures depends, in part, on our ability to generate cash in the future.  This ability is, to a certain extent, subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors that are beyond our control.

No assurance can be given that we will generate sufficient cash flow from operations or that future borrowings will be available to us in an amount sufficient to enable us to service and repay our indebtedness or to fund our other liquidity needs.  If we are unable to satisfy our debt obligations, we may have to undertake alternative financing plans, such as refinancing or restructuring our indebtedness, selling assets, reducing or delaying capital investments or seeking to raise additional capital.  We cannot assure that any refinancing or debt restructuring would be possible or, if possible, would be completed on favorable or acceptable terms, that any assets could be sold or that, if sold, the timing of the sales and the amount of proceeds realized from those sales would be favorable to us or that additional financing could be obtained on acceptable terms.  Disruptions in the capital and credit markets could adversely affect our ability to refinance our indebtedness, including our ability to borrow under our existing Credit Facility.   Banks that are party to our existing Credit Facility may not be able to meet their funding commitments to us if they experience shortages of capital and liquidity or if they experience excessive volumes of borrowing requests from us and other borrowers within a short period of time.

10

 


Because we are a Netherlands company, it may be difficult for you to sue our supervisory directors or us and it may not be possible to obtain or enforce judgments against us.

Although we are a Netherlands company, our assets are located in a variety of countries. In addition, not all members of our supervisory board of directors are residents of the same countries as other supervisory directors. As a result, it may not be possible for you to effect service of process within certain countries upon our supervisory directors, or to enforce against our supervisory directors or us judgments of courts of certain countries predicated upon civil liabilities under a country's federal securities laws. Because there is no treaty between certain countries and The Netherlands providing for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of judgments, some countries' judgments are not automatically enforceable in The Netherlands or in the United States, where the principal market for our shares is located. In addition, there is doubt as to whether a court in one country would impose civil liability on us or on the members of our supervisory board of directors in an original action brought against us or our supervisory directors in a court of competent jurisdiction in another country and predicated solely upon the federal securities laws of that other country.


ITEM 1B.  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.


ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

Currently, we have over 70 offices (totaling approximately 2.2 million square feet of space) in more than 50 countries. In these locations, we lease approximately 1.7 million square feet and own approximately 0.5 million square feet.  We serve our worldwide clients through six Advanced Technology Centers ("ATCs") that are located in Houston, Texas; Calgary, Canada; Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Abu Dhabi, UAE; and Aberdeen, Scotland. The ATCs provide support for our more than 50 regional specialty centers located throughout the global energy producing provinces. In addition, we have significant manufacturing facilities located in Godley, Texas, and Red Deer, Alberta, Canada, which are included in our Production Enhancement business segment.  Our facilities are adequate for our current operations. However, expansion into new facilities may be required to accommodate future growth.


ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

From time to time, we may be subject to legal proceedings and claims that arise in the ordinary course of business.


11

 

PART II


ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES


Stock Split

At our annual meeting on June 10, 2010, the shareholders approved an amendment to increase the authorized shares of our common stock from 100 million to 200 million and to increase the authorized shares of our preference stock from 3 million to 6 million.  In addition, shareholders approved the two-for-one stock split authorized by the Supervisory Board and thereby reduced the par value of each share from EUR 0.04 to EUR 0.02. As a result of the stock split, shareholders of record on June 30, 2010 received an additional share of common stock for each common share held.  The stock split was effected on July 8, 2010.  All references in the consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes to common shares, share prices, per share amounts and stock plans have been restated retroactively for the stock split.

Price Range of Common Shares

Our common shares trade on the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") under the symbol "CLB". The range of high and low sales prices per share of the common shares as reported by the NYSE are set in the following table for the periods indicated.


   
High
   
Low
 
2010
           
First Quarter
  $ 66.33     $ 58.30  
Second Quarter
    78.26       64.73  
Third Quarter
    89.80       73.63  
Fourth Quarter
    91.56       77.70  
2009
               
First Quarter
  $ 38.81     $ 30.25  
Second Quarter
    49.47       35.64  
Third Quarter
    52.48       39.05  
Fourth Quarter
    59.67       49.29  


On February 17, 2011, the closing price, as quoted by the NYSE, was $103.43 per share and there were 45,067,456 common shares issued and outstanding held by approximately 344 record holders and approximately 64,127 beneficial holders.  These amounts exclude shares held by us as treasury shares.

See Part III, "Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters" for discussion of equity compensation plans.

Dividend Policy

In July 2008, Core Laboratories announced the initiation of a cash dividend program. Cash dividends of $0.05 per share were paid in August and November of 2008 and in March, May, August and November of 2009. Cash dividends of $0.06 per share were paid in February, May, August, and November of 2010.  In addition, special cash dividends of $0.50 per share, $0.375 per share and $0.65 per share were paid in August 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively.  The declaration and payment of future dividends will be at the discretion of the Supervisory Board of Directors and will depend upon, among other things, future earnings, general financial condition, liquidity, capital requirements, and general business conditions.

Because we are a holding company that conducts substantially all of our operations through subsidiaries, our ability to pay cash dividends on the common shares is also dependent upon the ability of our subsidiaries to pay cash dividends or otherwise distribute or advance funds to us and on the terms and conditions of our existing and future credit arrangements. See "Liquidity and Capital Resources" included in "Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations."

12

 


Performance Graph

The following performance graph compares the performance of our common shares to the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index and the Standard & Poor’s Oil & Gas Equipment and Services Index (which has been selected as our peer group) for the period beginning December 31, 2005 and ending December 31, 2010. The graph assumes that the value of the investment in our common shares and each index was $100 at December 31, 2005 and that all dividends were reinvested. The stockholder return set forth below is not necessarily indicative of future performance. The following graph and related information shall not be deemed "soliciting material" or to be "filed" with the SEC, nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, except to the extent that Core Laboratories specifically incorporates it by reference into such filing.
 
Graphic
 
Share Repurchases in the Fourth Quarter of 2010
 
 
The following table provides information about purchases of equity securities that are registered by us pursuant to Section 12 of the Exchange Act during the three months ended December 31, 2010:

Period
 
Total Number Of Shares Purchased
   
Average Price Paid Per Share
   
Total Number Of Shares Purchased As Part Of A Publicly Announced Program
   
Maximum Number Of Shares That May Be Purchased Under The Program (3)
 
October 1-31, 2010
    0       0       0       7,927,848  
November 1-30,2010 (1)
    580     $ 82.86       580       8,051,851  
December 1-31, 2010 (2)
    4,168     $ 86.81       4,168       8,514,691  
Total
    4,748     $ 86.33       4,748       8,514,691  

(1)  
580 shares valued at $48 thousand, or $82.86 per share, surrendered to us by participants in a stock-based compensation plan to settle any personal tax liabilities which may result from the award.
(2)  
4,168 shares valued at $0.4 million, or $86.81 per share, surrendered to us by participants in a stock-based compensation plan to settle any personal tax liabilities which may result from the award.
(3)  
During the quarter 601,929 shares were distributed from the share repurchase program relating to stock-based awards, stock options, and the early exchange of our Senior Exchangeable Notes.

13

 


In connection with our initial public offering in September 1995, our shareholders authorized our Management Board to repurchase up to 10% of our issued share capital, the maximum allowed under Dutch law at the time, for a period of 18 months.  This authorization was renewed at subsequent annual or special shareholder meetings.  At our annual shareholders’ meeting on June 10, 2010, our shareholders authorized an extension through December 10, 2011 to purchase up to 25.6% of our issued share capital, consisting of 10% of our issued share capital which may be used for any legal purpose and an additional 15.6% of our issued shares to fulfill obligations relating to our Senior Exchangeable Notes (the “Notes”) or warrants. The repurchase of shares in the open market is at the discretion of management pursuant to this shareholder authorization.

From the activation of the share repurchase program through December 31, 2010, we have repurchased 32,453,473 shares for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $726.2 million, or an average price of $22.38 per share and have cancelled 26,835,494 shares at a cost of $425.3 million. At December 31, 2010, we held 4,218,726 shares in treasury and have the authority to repurchase 8,514,691 additional shares under our stock repurchase program. The past cancellation of shares had also been approved by shareholders at prior shareholder meetings.

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The selected consolidated financial information contained below is derived from our Consolidated Financial Statements and should be read in conjunction with "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and our audited Consolidated Financial Statements.

   
Year Ended December 31,
 
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008 (3)
   
2007 (3)
   
2006 (3)
 
   
(in thousands, except per share and other data)
 
                               
Financial Statement Data:
                             
Revenues
  $ 794,653     $ 695,539     $ 780,836     $ 670,540     $ 575,689  
Net income attributable to Core Laboratories N.V.
    144,917       113,604       131,166       111,212       81,045  
Working capital
    69,967       284,129       139,955       116,276       130,249  
Total assets
    636,042       658,166       521,535       476,754       467,244  
Long-term debt and capital lease obligations,
                                       
   including current maturities
    147,543       209,112       194,568       230,594       214,503  
Total equity
    292,340       281,758       188,285       108,026       127,572  
Earnings Per Share Information:
                                       
Net income attributable to Core Laboratories N.V.:
                                       
   Basic
  $ 3.23     $ 2.47     $ 2.85     $ 2.36     $ 1.61  
   Diluted
  $ 3.00     $ 2.43     $ 2.74     $ 2.28     $ 1.51  
Weighted average common shares outstanding:
                                       
   Basic
    44,830       45,939       46,017       47,073       50,314  
   Diluted
    48,241       46,657       47,887       48,815       53,776  
Cash dividends declared per share
  $ 0.89     $ 0.575     $ 0.60     $ -     $ -  
Other Data:
                                       
Current ratio (1)
 
1.2:1
   
3.7:1
   
2.5:1
   
2.2:1
   
2.5:1
 
Debt to capitalization ratio (2)
    27 %     34 %     52 %     69 %     62 %

 
________________
 

(1)
Current ratio is calculated as follows: current assets divided by current liabilities.

(2)
Debt to capitalization ratio is calculated as follows: debt divided by the sum of cash, debt and equity.

(3)
Results have been revised upon adoption of FASB Accounting Standards Codification 470-20.  See Note 8 Debt and Capital Lease Obligations for more information.

14

 


ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATION

Core Laboratories N.V. is a Netherlands limited liability company.  We were established in 1936 and are one of the world's leading providers of proprietary and patented reservoir description, production enhancement and reservoir management products and services to the oil and gas industry, primarily through customer relationships with many of the world's major, national and independent oil companies.

Our business units have been aggregated into three complementary segments:

-
Reservoir Description:  Encompasses the characterization of petroleum reservoir rock, fluid and gas samples.  We provide analytical and field services to characterize properties of crude oil and petroleum products to the oil and gas industry.
   
-
Production Enhancement:  Includes products and services relating to reservoir well completions, perforations, stimulations and production.  We provide integrated services to evaluate the effectiveness of well completions and to develop solutions aimed at increasing the effectiveness of enhanced oil recovery projects.
   
-
Reservoir Management:  Combines and integrates information from reservoir description and production enhancement services to increase production and improve recovery of oil and gas from our clients' reservoirs.

General Overview

We provide services and design and produce products which enable our clients to evaluate reservoir performance and increase oil and gas recovery from new and existing fields.  These services and products are generally in higher demand when our clients are investing capital in exploration and development efforts to explore new fields or to increase productivity in existing fields.  Our clients' investment in capital expenditure programs tends to correlate to oil and natural gas commodity prices.  During periods of higher prices, our clients generally invest more in capital expenditures and, during periods of lower commodity prices, they tend to invest less.  Accordingly, the level of capital expenditures by our clients impacts the demand for our services and products.

For most of 2008, global demand for oil and gas drilling activity was at the highest level in over twenty years.  In the second half of 2008, the financial market crisis and the start of a global economic recession led to a decrease in demand for oil and gas; consequently oilfield activity began to decline as oil and gas companies reduced their spending levels.  However, in late 2009, a global economic recovery began that continued steadily into 2010 and brought with it higher oil related prices which led to increased capital budgets for our clients.

The general crude oil market conditions in the United States in 2010 improved along with increases in global demand which led to higher crude oil prices that approached pre-recession levels by the end of the year.  This created a positive impact on our business compared to the volatility experienced in late 2008 and throughout 2009.

Natural gas prices in 2010 had a different reaction to the overall increase in global demand for oil and gas products.  Prices began a downward trend from their highs in mid-2008, a volatile 2009, with continued decreases throughout 2010.  In spite of this, but due to these decreasing prices for natural gas being the result of an increase in the global supply instead of a decrease in the global demand, activity levels in this sector managed to increase.

The following table summarizes the average worldwide, U.S., and Non-North American rig counts for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, as well as the annual average spot price of a barrel of West Texas Intermediate crude and an MMBtu of natural gas:

15

 

 
       
 
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
                   
Baker Hughes Worldwide Average Rig Count (1)
    2,985       2,304       3,336  
Baker Hughes U.S. Average Rig Count (1)
    1,541       1,086       1,878  
M-I SWACO Non-North America Rig Count (2)
    2,870       2,742       2,748  
Average Crude Oil Price per Barrel (3)
  $ 79.39     $ 61.95     $ 99.67  
Average Natural Gas Price per MMBtu (4)
  $ 5.13     $ 6.92     $ 9.34  

           
(1) Twelve month average rig count as reported by Baker Hughes Incorporated - Worldwide Rig Count.
(2)  Twelve month average rig count as reported by M-I SWACO Worldwide Rig Count as reported under the January 2010 revision.
(3) Average daily West Texas Intermediate crude spot price.
(4) Obtained from Bloomberg NGH1 average price for the years December 31, 2010, 2009, and 2008.

Operators determined that the economics of certain projects would be viable at the higher commodity prices in 2010 compared to 2009 which led to an increase in rig count in 2010, particularly rigs drilling for oil, both in North America and worldwide.  Although the North American rig count began to rise slightly in the last quarter of 2009, the average rig count in North America in 2009 was down over 40% from 2008 levels due to the prices for oil and gas being down significantly.  Industry activity levels outside of North America did not experience these same reductions that North America did in the latter part of 2008, however in 2009 the international market activity also declined as the global demand for energy weakened.

Increases in activity levels in 2010 by our clients combined with greater market share, led to higher revenues over 2009 across all of our business segments.   Given these higher revenues, in conjunction with the lower cost structure attained during the global economic recession, we were able to generate operating income that was 21% higher in 2010 than the prior year.  This increase was driven primarily by our Production Enhancement and Reservoir Management segments with operating income increases of 56% and 35%, respectively.

Outlook

We continue our efforts to expand our market presence by opening or expanding facilities in strategic areas and realizing synergies within our business lines.  We believe our market presence provides us a unique opportunity to service clients who have global operations in addition to the national oil companies.

We have established internal earnings targets that are based on market conditions existing at the time our targets were established.  Based on recent developments, we believe that the current level of activities, workflows, and operating margins both outside North America and within North America will grow moderately into 2011.

We expect to meet ongoing working capital needs, capital expenditure requirements and funding of our dividend and share repurchase programs from a combination of cash on hand, cash flow from operating activities and available borrowings under our revolving credit facility

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our financial statements are prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S. ("U.S. GAAP") and require us to make estimates and assumptions during their preparation which requires judgment. Our accounting policies and procedures are explained in Note 2 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements contained elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.  The following transaction types require significant judgment and, therefore, are considered critical accounting policies as of December 31, 2010:

Revenue Recognition

Revenues are recognized as services are completed or as product title is transferred. All advance client payments are classified as unearned revenues until services are performed or product title is transferred. We recognize revenue when we determine that the following criteria are met: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; (ii) delivery has occurred or services have been rendered; (iii) the fee is fixed or determinable; and (iv) collectability is reasonably assured. Revenues from long-term contracts are recorded as services are rendered in proportion to the work performed. All known or anticipated losses on contracts are provided for currently. Training and consulting service revenues are recognized as the services are performed.

16

 


Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

We perform ongoing credit evaluations of our clients and monitor collections and payments in order to maintain a provision for estimated uncollectible accounts based on our historical collection experience and our current aging of client receivables outstanding in addition to clients' representations and our understanding of the economic environment in which our clients operate.  Based on our review, we establish or adjust allowances for specific clients and the accounts receivable as a whole.  Our allowance for doubtful accounts at December 31, 2010 was $3.4 million compared to $3.2 million at December 31, 2009.

Long-Lived Assets, Intangibles and Goodwill

Property, plant and equipment are carried at cost. Major renewals and improvements are capitalized and depreciated over the respective asset's remaining useful life. Maintenance and repair costs are charged to expense as incurred. When long-lived assets are sold or retired, the remaining costs and related accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts and any resulting gain or loss is included in income.

Property, plant and equipment held and used is reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying amounts may not be recoverable over the remaining service life. Indicators of possible impairment include extended periods of idle use or significant declines in activity levels in regions where specific assets or groups of assets are located.

Provisions for asset impairment are charged to income when the net book value of the assets, or carrying value, is determined to be unrecoverable and the carrying value exceeds the fair value of the assets.  Fair value is the amount that would be received from the sale of an asset or paid for the transfer of a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants determined by applying various market multiples.  We did not record any material impairment charges relating to our long-lived assets held for use during the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 or 2008.     

We review our goodwill, the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of net assets acquired in business combinations, annually for impairment or more frequently if an event occurs which may indicate impairment during the year.  We evaluated assets with indefinite lives, including goodwill and certain intangible assets, for impairment by comparing the fair value of our reportable segments to their net carrying value as of the balance sheet date, after excluding inter-company transactions and allocating corporate assets to the reportable segments.  We estimated the fair value by performing a discounted future cash flow analysis of each reportable segment.  Estimated future cash flows are based on historical data adjusted for the company’s best estimate of future performance.  If the carrying value of the reportable segment exceeds the fair value determined, an impairment loss is recorded to the extent that the implied fair value of the goodwill of the segment is less than its carrying value.   Any subsequent impairment loss could result in a material adverse effect upon our financial position and results of operations. We did not record impairment charges relating to our goodwill during the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 or 2008.

Inventory Valuation Allowances

Our valuation reserve for inventory is based on historical regional sales trends, and various other assumptions and judgments including future demand for this inventory.  Should these assumptions and judgments not occur, our valuation allowance would be adjusted to reflect actual results. Our industry is subject to technological change and new product development that could result in obsolete inventory. Our valuation reserve for inventory at December 31, 2010 was $1.9 million compared to $2.2 million at December 31, 2009.  If we overestimate demand for inventory, it could result in a material adverse effect upon our financial position and results of operations.

Income Taxes

Our income tax expense includes income taxes of The Netherlands, the U.S. and other foreign countries as well as local, state and provincial income taxes. We recognize deferred tax assets or liabilities for the differences between the financial statement carrying amount and tax basis of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the years in which the asset is recovered or the liability is settled. Any valuation allowance recorded is based on estimates and assumptions of taxable income into the future and a determination is made of the magnitude of deferred tax assets which are more likely than not to be realized.  Valuation allowances of our net deferred tax assets aggregated to $10.7 million and $10.7 million at December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.  If these estimates and related assumptions change in the future, we may be required to record additional valuation allowances against our deferred tax assets and our effective tax rate may increase which could result in a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations and cash flows. We have not provided for deferred taxes on the unremitted earnings of certain subsidiaries that we consider to be permanently reinvested.  Should we make a distribution of the unremitted earnings of these subsidiaries, we may be required to record additional taxes.  We record a liability for unrecognized tax benefits resulting from uncertain tax positions taken or

17

 

expected to be taken in our tax return. We also recognize interest and penalties, if any, related to unrecognized tax benefits in income tax expense.

Stock-Based Compensation

We have two stock-based compensation plans, as described in further detail in Note 13 to our Consolidated Financial Statements. For new awards issued and awards modified, repurchased or cancelled, the compensation expense is equal to the fair value of the award at the date of the grant and is recognized in the Consolidated Statement of Operations for those awards earned over the requisite service period of the award.  The fair value is determined by calculating the discounted value of the shares over the vesting period and applying an estimated forfeiture rate.

Pensions and Other Postretirement Benefits

We maintain a noncontributory defined benefit pension plan for substantially all of our Dutch employees hired before 2007.  As required by current accounting standards, we recognize net periodic pension costs associated with this plan in income from current operations and recognize the unfunded status of the plan, if any, as a long-term liability. In addition, we recognize as a component of other comprehensive income, the gains or losses and prior service costs or credits that arise during the period but are not recognized as components of net periodic pension cost.  The projection of benefit obligation and fair value of plan assets requires the use of assumptions and estimates.  Actual results could differ from those estimates.  See Note 10 Pensions and Other Postretirement Benefit Plans.  Furthermore, we sponsor several defined contribution plans for the benefit of our employees.  We expense these contributions in the period the contribution is made.

Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP requires us to make certain estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. We evaluate our estimates on an ongoing basis and determine the adequacy of our estimates based on our historical experience and various other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances. By nature, these judgments are subject to an inherent degree of uncertainty. We consider an accounting estimate to be critical if it is highly subjective and if changes in the estimate under different assumptions would result in a material impact on our financial condition and results of operations.  The following table summarizes key estimates and assumptions used to prepare our Consolidated Financial Statements for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 or 2008.

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Account
 
Nature of Estimates Required
 
Assumptions Used
Allowance for doubtful accounts
 
We evaluate whether client receivables are collectible.
 
See "Allowance for Doubtful Accounts."
Inventory reserves
 
We forecast client demand, considering changes in technology which could result in obsolescence.
 
See "Inventory Valuation Allowances."
Depreciation and amortization
 
We estimate the useful lives and salvage values of our assets.
 
Useful lives assigned reflect our best estimate based on historical data of the respective asset's useful life and salvage value. These assets could become impaired if our operating plans or business environment changes.
Pensions and other postretirement benefits
 
We utilize an actuary to assist in determining the value of the projected benefit obligation under a Dutch pension plan.  This valuation requires various estimates and assumptions concerning mortality, future pay increases and discount rate used to value our obligations.  In addition, we recognize net periodic benefit cost based upon these estimates.
 
The actuarial assumptions used are based upon professional judgment and historical experience, including trends in mortality rates, and credit market rates (discount rate).
Stock-based compensation
 
We evaluate the probability that certain of our stock-based plans will meet targets established within the respective agreements and result in the vesting of such awards.  In addition, we derive an estimated forfeiture rate that is used in calculating the expense for these awards.
 
See "Stock-Based Compensation." Comparisons to our stock price, a return on our stock price compared to certain stock indices or a return on equity calculation.
Income taxes
 
We estimate the likelihood of the recoverability of our deferred tax assets (particularly, net operating loss carry-forwards).
 
See "Income Taxes." We examine our historical and projected operating results, review the eligible carry-forward period and tax planning opportunities and consider other relevant information. Changes in tax laws for the jurisdictions in which we operate could significantly impact our estimates.
Long-lived assets, intangibles and goodwill
 
We evaluate the recoverability of our assets periodically, but at least annually, by examining current and projected operating results to identify any triggering events, which may indicate impairment.  We compare the carrying value of the assets to a projection of fair value, utilizing judgment as to the identification of reporting units, the allocation of corporate assets amongst reporting units and the determination of the appropriate discount rate.
 
See "Long-Lived Assets, Intangibles and Goodwill." Our impairment analysis is subjective and includes estimates based on assumptions regarding future growth rates, interest rates and operating expenses.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

Other than normal operating leases, we do not have any off–balance sheet financing arrangements such as securitization agreements, liquidity trust vehicles, synthetic leases or special purpose entities. As such, we are not materially exposed to any financing, liquidity, market or credit risk that could arise if we had engaged in such financing arrangements.

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Results of Operations

Results of operations as a percentage of applicable revenues are as follows (dollars in thousands):

   
Year Ended
   
% Change
 
REVENUES:
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
      2010/2009       2009/2008  
Services
  $ 605,974       76.3   $ 553,772       79.6   $ 597,695       76.5     9.4     (7.3 %)
Product Sales
    188,679       23.7     141,767       20.4     183,141       23.5     33.1     (22.6 %)
      794,653       100.0     695,539       100.0     780,836       100.0     14.2     (10.9 %)
OPERATING EXPENSES:
                                                               
Cost of services*
    383,079       63.2     352,039       63.6     387,145       64.8     8.8     (9.1 %)
Cost of product sales*
    130,711       69.3     105,730       74.6     127,637       69.7     23.6     (17.2 %)
Total cost of services and product sales
    513,790       64.7     457,769       65.8     514,782       65.9     12.2     (11.1 %)
General and administrative expenses
    33,029       4.1     30,372       4.4     31,646       4.1     8.7     (4.0 %)
Depreciation and amortization
    23,113       2.9     23,818       3.4     21,773       2.8     (3.0 %)     9.4
Other (income) expense, net
    (2,205 )     (0.3 %)     (3,202 )     (0.5 %)     5,580       0.7  
NM
   
NM
 
OPERATING INCOME
    226,926       28.6     186,782       26.9     207,055       26.5     21.5     (9.8 %)
(Gain) loss on early extinguishment of
       debt
    1,939       0.3     -       -       (2,829 )     (0.4 %)     100.0     (100.0 %)
Interest expense
    15,839       2.0     15,523       2.3     21,610       2.8     2.0     (28.2 %)
Income before income tax expense
    209,148       26.3     171,259       24.6     188,274       24.1     22.1     (9.0 %)
Income tax expense
    63,747       8.0     57,164       8.2     56,766       7.3     11.5     0.7
Net income
    145,401       18.3     114,095       16.4     131,508       16.8     27.4     (13.2 %)
Net income attributable to non-controlling interest
    484       0.1     491       0.1     342       -     (1.4 %)     43.6
Net income attributable to Core Laboratories N.V.
  $ 144,917       18.2   $ 113,604       16.3   $ 131,166       16.8     27.6     (13.4 %)
                                                                 
*Percentage based on applicable revenue rather than total revenue.
 
"NM" means not meaningful.
 

Operating Results for the Year Ended December 31, 2010 Compared to the Years Ended December 31, 2009 and 2008

We evaluate our operating results by analyzing revenues, operating income margin (defined as operating income divided by total revenue) and net income margin (defined as net income divided by total revenue).  Since we have a relatively fixed cost structure, increases in revenues generally translate into higher operating income margin and income margin percentages.  Results for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 are summarized in the following chart:
 

 
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Service Revenues

Service revenues increased to $606.0 million for 2010 from $553.8 million for 2009 and $597.7 million for 2008.  The increase in service revenue from 2009 to 2010 was due, in part, to the increased demand for reservoir rock studies, reservoir fluids phase-behavior studies, and for crude oil testing, inspection, distillation, assay, fractionation and characterization projects worldwide.  The decrease in revenue in 2009 compared with 2008 was the result of a significant decline in oil and gas prices and drilling activity from record highs reached mid-year 2008; however, this decrease was softened by our improved penetration of international markets in 2009.  Our large scale core analyses and reservoir fluid projects combined with our fluid and derived products inspection, calibration and assay work continue to provide meaningful revenue streams in the Middle East, Asia-Pacific, offshore deepwater regions of the Gulf of Mexico and the southern-Atlantic margins off the coasts of West Africa and Brazil.  Activity in North American shale plays, especially the liquid-rich plays, has strengthened throughout 2010 leading to growth in reservoir characterization projects.

Product Sale Revenues

Product sale revenues increased to $188.7 million for 2010, from $141.8 million for 2009 and $183.1 million for 2008.  The increase in revenue from 2009 to 2010 was driven by (1) the acceptance and demand of our specialized completion products introduced over the last three years, (2) an increased market share in North American natural gas and oil shale reservoirs and (3) an increased market penetration in the Middle East and Asia-Pacific perforating markets.  Our product sales revenues were impacted by the significant decline in the North American drilling activity during 2009; however, our revenues declined at a much lower rate compared to the 42% decrease in the average North American rig count from 2008 to 2009.  This revenue decline was mitigated by the additional market share and the acceptance of our specialized reservoir optimizing technologies.  These specialized reservoir optimizing technologies are focused on high-end well completion and stimulation programs mainly in the Haynesville, Marcellus and Eagle Ford shale plays and in multi-stage completions in the Bakken oil-shale play.  We are also providing high margin completion and recompletion technologies to be used in the redevelopment of major, giant, and super-giant fields in southern Iraq.

Cost of Services

Cost of services increased to $383.1 million for 2010 from $352.0 million for 2009 and $387.1 million for 2008.  As a percentage of service revenue, cost of services have continued to decrease to 63.2% in 2010 from 63.6% in 2009 and 64.8% in 2008.  The continuous decline in the cost of services relative to service revenue has been primarily a result of our continued focus on emphasizing higher value and thus higher margin services as well as managing our cost structure.

Cost of Product Sales

Cost of product sales increased to $130.7 million for 2010 from $105.7 million for 2009 and $127.6 million for 2008.  As a percentage of product sale revenues, cost of sales decreased to 69.3% for 2010 compared to 74.6% for 2009 and 69.7% for 2008.  The decrease in cost of sales as a percentage of product sale revenue in 2010, as compared to 2009, was primarily due to the growing demand for our new technologies, which are our higher margin products, and from an overall increase in sales, which improved absorption of our fixed cost structure.  In addition, our capital investments in our manufacturing processes resulted in increased productivity and increased manufacturing efficiencies which contributed to the decrease in cost of sales.  The reduction in margins from 2008 to 2009 came primarily from reduced manufacturing efficiencies associated with lower production levels as a result of the significant decline in North American drilling activity.

General and Administrative Expense

General and administrative expenses include corporate management and centralized administrative services that benefit our operations. General and administrative expenses were $33.0 million for 2010, which was 9% higher than in 2009, due to higher building maintenance costs, increased computer hardware and software costs and additional compensation expenses. General and administrative expenses decreased in 2009 by 4% in comparison to 2008 primarily due to lower compensation benefits for certain members of management.

Depreciation and Amortization Expense

Depreciation and amortization expense of $23.1 million decreased slightly by $0.7 million in 2010 compared to 2009, after increasing $2.0 million in 2009 compared to 2008.  The increase in 2009 compared to 2008 was primarily due to normal capital expenditures for replacement of existing equipment and investment in areas of growth.

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Other (Income) Expense, Net

The components of other (income) expense, net, were as follows (in thousands):

   
Year Ended December 31,
 
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
                   
(Gain) loss on sale of assets
  $ (176 )   $ 90     $ (2,015 )
Equity in (income) of affiliates
    (376 )     (92 )     (300 )
Foreign exchange (gain) loss
    1,032       (331 )     6,555  
Interest (income)
    (249 )     (138 )     (848 )
Non-income tax (benefit) expense
    -       (2,500 )     5,030  
Rent and royalty (income)
    (1,550 )     (1,358 )     (2,150 )
Other (gain) loss
    (886 )     1,127       (692 )
Total other (income) expense, net
  $ (2,205 )   $ (3,202 )   $ 5,580  

In 2010, we sold our minority investment in a technology company acquired in 2001, resulting in a gain of $0.8 million.

In April, 2010, we recorded a Euro-denominated income tax receivable in The Netherlands.  Payment was received in June after the Euro fell 9% resulting in a foreign exchange loss of $1.4 million.   During 2009, most foreign currencies gained versus the USD as compared to 2008 when the USD strengthened significantly against most other currencies.  Virtually all of the foreign currency gains experienced in 2009 were offset by our foreign currency losses related to the devaluation of the Venezuelan Bolivar (“VEB”).

In 2008, we revised our estimate of a contingent liability associated with non-income related taxes, and as a result, a charge to income of $5.0 million was recorded in the Consolidated Statements of Operations to Other Expense (Income), net.  This contingent liability was included in Other Long-term Liabilities in the Consolidated Balance Sheet at December 31, 2008.  As a result of finalizing a settlement agreement for $2.5 million, we released the remaining $2.5 million during the second quarter of 2009.

In 2008, we recorded a gain of $1.1 million in connection with the sale of a small office building.

Gain on Repurchase of Senior Exchangeable Notes

During the fourth quarter of 2008, we repurchased $61.3 million of our Notes at a discount which resulted in a gain of $2.8 million.

Loss on Exchange of Senior Exchangeable Notes

Under the terms of our Notes the early exchange option for the holders of our Notes was enabled in the second, third and fourth quarters of 2010. We received 21 requests during 2010 to exchange 82,251 Notes, which were settled during the year for $82.3 million in cash and 808,367 shares of our common stock, all of which were Treasury Shares, resulting in a loss of $1.9 million.

Interest Expense

Interest expense increased slightly in 2010 compared to 2009 and decreased $6.1 million in 2009 compared to 2008.  At the end of the second quarter of 2008, the early exchange feature of our Notes was triggered which resulted in our Notes being classified as short-term and required the write-off of $3.5 million in deferred debt acquisition costs to interest expense.  In 2008, we repurchased approximately 20% of our Notes at a discount; consequently, the monthly amortization of the debt discount was lower in 2009 than in 2008.  Cash interest expense on our Notes was only $0.6 million, $0.6 million and $0.8 million for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.

Income Tax Expense

Income tax expense increased $6.6 million in 2010 compared to 2009 commensurate with the overall increase in income before income tax expense.  Income tax expense increased $0.4 million in 2009 compared to 2008 despite a decrease in net income before taxes due primarily to the recapture of tax consolidation benefits in Mexico with respect to recent changes in the tax laws and additional taxes provided for specific tax uncertainties in the various jurisdictions in which we operate.  The effective tax rate was 30.5% for 2010, 33.4% for 2009 and 30.2% for 2008. The lower tax rate for 2010 was the result of a change in the earnings mix in the various jurisdictions in which we operate.  The higher tax rate for 2009 compared to 2008 was due to the recapture of tax consolidation benefits in Mexico with respect to recent changes in the tax laws, additional taxes provided for specific tax uncertainties in the various jurisdictions in which we operate and the operational losses and asset write down in Venezuela that are without tax benefit.

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Segment Analysis

The following charts and tables summarize the operating results for our three complementary business segments.
 
 
                             
 
                                  
 
           
               
Segment Revenues
   
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
 (dollars in thousands)
 
2010
   
% Change
   
2009
   
% Change
   
2008
 
                               
Reservoir Description
  $ 425,829       2.6   $ 414,934       (4.7 %)   $ 435,425  
Production Enhancement
    313,956       36.1     230,652       (21.3 %)     293,017  
Reservoir Management
    54,868       9.8     49,953       (4.7 %)     52,394  
Total Revenues
  $ 794,653       14.2   $ 695,539       (10.9 %)   $ 780,836  

Segment Operating Income
   
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
 (dollars in thousands)
 
2010
   
% Change
   
2009
   
% Change
   
2008
 
                               
Reservoir Description
  $ 106,179       (0.2 %)   $ 106,421       4.6   $ 101,783  
Production Enhancement
    101,241       55.6     65,076       (30.0 %)     93,025  
Reservoir Management
    19,759       35.2     14,620       (9.9 %)     16,224  
Corporate and other (1)
    (253 )  
NM
 (2)     665    
NM
 (2)     (3,977 )
     Operating Income
  $ 226,926       21.5   $ 186,782       (9.8 %)   $ 207,055  
                                         
(1) “Corporate and other" represents those items that are not directly relating to a particular segment.
 
(2) "NM" means not meaningful.
 
   

Segment Operating Income Margins (1)
   
For the Years Ended December 31,
 
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
   
Margin
   
Margin
   
Margin
 
Reservoir Description
    24.9 %     25.6 %     23.4 %
Production Enhancement
    32.2 %     28.2 %     31.7 %
Reservoir Management
    36.0 %     29.3 %     31.0 %
   Total Company
    28.6 %     26.9 %     26.5 %
                         
(1) Calculated by dividing "Operating Income" by "Revenue".
 

Reservoir Description

Revenues for our Reservoir Description segment increased by 2.6% in 2010 compared to 2009, after decreasing 4.7% in 2009 compared to 2008.  During 2010, this segment’s operations continued to benefit from large-scale core analyses and advanced rock properties studies from the eastern Mediterranean region, the Middle East and West Africa offshore.  This segment continued to realize increased demand for reservoir fluids phase-behavior studies, and for crude oil testing, inspection, distillation, assay, fractionation and characterization projects worldwide.  Other areas that continue to provide revenue growth are the continued expansion of worldwide development projects particularly in West Africa, Asia Pacific, and the North Sea, as well as the North American gas shale and oil and liquid-rich plays in the Eagle Ford, Haynesville, Muskwa and other active fields.  The revenue

23

 

decrease in 2009 was the result of a significant decline in oil and gas prices and drilling activity from record highs in 2008, which affected demand for some of the services in this segment. Due to our significant international operations and projects such as our reservoir rock and reservoir fluids characterization projects, this segment has continued to improve its operating income and margins despite the recent downturn experienced throughout the industry. During 2009, we experienced increased demand for our services in the Middle East and Asia-Pacific and for our continued large scale core analyses studies as well as crude oil and derived petroleum products characterization studies on a global basis.

Operating income and operating income margin decreased slightly in 2010 from 2009 as a result of slightly higher costs in certain operating areas.  Operating income and operating margin increased 4.6% in 2009 from 2008 due to continued emphasis on higher value and thus higher margin services on internationally-based development and production-related crude oil projects, in addition to the de-emphasis of the more cyclical exploration-related projects along with an emphasis on controlling costs.

Production Enhancement

Revenues for our Production Enhancement segment increased by $83.3 million, or 36.1% in 2010 compared to 2009, primarily due to the increased acceptance by our clients of our high margin completion products as well as our fracture diagnostic services, and an increased market share of our perforating charges and gun systems particularly in the North American markets relating to horizontal well developments of gas-shale and oil-shale reservoirs and for high margin completion and recompletion technologies used in the reworking of major, giant, and super-giant fields in southern Iraq. Revenues for our Production Enhancement segment decreased 21.3% in 2009 compared to 2008, primarily due to the significant decline in North American drilling activity.  However, during this period, where the average rig count for North America dropped 42%, we maintained our focus on high-end well completion and stimulation programs, which resulted in improved market penetration and client acceptance of our well perforating and completion products and fracture diagnostic services.  We also concentrated our focus on the Haynesville, Marcellus, and Eagle Ford Shale developments. As a result, we were able to moderate the decline in our revenues versus the declining drilling activity levels when comparing 2009 over 2008. The downward trend in the North America rig count that started in the latter half of 2008 appears to have stabilized.

Operating income for this segment increased to $101.2 million in 2010 from $65.1 million in 2009, an increase of 55.6%. The increase in margins in 2010 was primarily driven by our continued market penetration of higher-margin services including our proprietary and patented diagnostic technologies, such as SpectraChem® Plus+, SpectraScan®, ZeroWash®, and our HERO™ line of perforating charges and gun systems and our new Horizontal Time-Delayed Ballistics Actuated Sequential Transfer (HTD-Blast™) perforating system which is used for the perforation of extended-reach horizontal completions.  Operating income for this segment decreased to $65.1 million in 2009 from $93.0 million in 2008, a decrease of 30.0%. The decrease in margins in 2009 was primarily driven by the significant decline in North American drilling activities, and as a result, we reduced manufacturing levels which negatively impacted the efficiency of our manufacturing operations.  Additionally, reduced demand in North America decreased margins due to pressure on pricing; however, this was partially offset by our continued market penetration of higher-margin services including our proprietary and patented fracture diagnostic technologies, such as our SpectraScan® and recently introduced SpectraChem® Plus+, tracer service coupled with an on-going emphasis on controlling costs.

Reservoir Management

Revenues for our Reservoir Management segment increased to $54.9 million in 2010 from $50.0 million in 2009 and $52.4 million in 2008.  The increase in revenue in 2010 was due to ongoing interest in several of our existing multi-client reservoir studies including new studies in the Montney Shale in northeastern British Columbia and northern Alberta, and the Eagle Ford Shale in south Texas, along with the continued participation in our North American Gas Shale Study and our new Worldwide Oil and Natural Gas Shale Reservoir Study.  In addition, increased revenue was provided by our proprietary studies, including studies of offshore Ivory Coast, Ghana and Nigeria, a gas-shale reconnaissance project in Indonesia and detailed proprietary reservoir studies for several companies active in the Wolfberry play in West Texas.  The decline in revenue in 2009 as compared to 2008 was a result of lower demand for our permanent well monitoring instrumentation in Canada oil sands and our decision to stop selling these systems in Venezuela.  We continued to grow our consortium studies revenue, especially studies pertaining to unconventional gas reservoirs, to partially offset reduced demand for our reservoir monitoring systems.  Additional studies initiated in 2009 included the expansion of our unconventional natural gas reservoir studies to different regions in North America, deepwater studies off the coasts of Brazil and West Africa, and a study on the petroleum potential of offshore Vietnam. Significant studies in 2009 and 2008 were Reservoir Characterization and Production Properties of Gas Shales and Geological, Petrophysical, and Geomechanical Properties of Tight Gas Sands as well as several other proprietary studies.

Operating income for this segment increased to $19.8 million in 2010 compared to $14.6 million in 2009 and $16.2 million in 2008.  The increase in operating income in 2010 as compared to 2009 was primarily related to growth in our consortium projects and the delivery of completed consortium projects.  The decrease in operating income in 2009 from 2008 was primarily due to the decline in sales of our reservoir monitoring systems.

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

General

We have historically financed our activities through cash on hand, cash flows from operations, bank credit facilities, equity financing and the issuance of debt.  Cash flow from operating activities provides the primary source of funds to finance operating needs, capital expenditures and our share repurchase program.  If necessary, we supplement this cash flow with borrowings under bank credit facilities to finance some capital expenditures and business acquisitions.  As we are a Netherlands holding company, we conduct substantially all of our operations through subsidiaries.  Our cash availability is largely dependent upon the ability of our subsidiaries to pay cash dividends or otherwise distribute or advance funds to us.

We utilize the non-GAAP financial measure of free cash flow to evaluate our cash flows and results of operations.  Free cash flow is defined as net cash provided by operating activities (which is the most directly comparable GAAP measure) less capital expenditures.  Management believes that free cash flow provides useful information to investors as it represents the cash, in excess of capital expenditures, available to operate the business and fund non-discretionary obligations. Free cash flow is not a measure of operating performance under GAAP, and should not be considered in isolation nor construed as an alternative to operating profit, net income (loss) or cash flows from operating, investing or financing activities, each as determined in accordance with GAAP. Free cash flow does not represent residual cash available for distribution because we may have other non-discretionary expenditures that are not deducted from the measure. Moreover, since free cash flow is not a measure determined in accordance with GAAP and thus is susceptible to varying interpretations and calculations, free cash flow as presented, may not be comparable to similarly titled measures presented by other companies.  The following table reconciles this non-GAAP financial measure to the most directly comparable measure calculated and presented in accordance with U.S. GAAP for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 (in thousands):

   
Year Ended December 31,
 
Free Cash Flow Calculation
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
Net cash provided by operating activities
  $ 205,832     $ 181,873     $ 155,207  
Less: capital expenditures
    (27,569 )     (17,289 )     (30,950 )
Free cash flow
  $ 178,263     $ 164,584     $ 124,257  

The increase in free cash flow in 2010 compared to 2009 and 2008 was primarily due to an increase in net income, partially offset by an increase in capital expenditures. Working capital was $70.0 million and $284.1 million at December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

Cash Flows

The following table summarizes cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 (in thousands):

   
Year Ended December 31,
 
   
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
Cash provided by/(used in):
     
Operating activities
  $ 205,832     $ 181,873     $ 155,207  
Investing activities
    (38,581 )     (18,540 )     (41,108 )
Financing activities
    (214,416 )     (18,426 )     (103,578 )
Net change in cash and cash equivalents
  $ (47,165 )   $ 144,907     $ 10,521  

The increase in cash flow from operating activities in 2010 compared to 2009 was primarily due to an increase in net income.  The increase in cash flow from operating activities in 2009 compared to 2008 was primarily due to improved collections of receivables, approximately $9 million of advance payments from clients and deferred tax liabilities offset by a decrease in net income.

Cash flow used in investing activities increased $20.0 million in 2010 over 2009 due to higher capital expenditures and an acquisition for $9.0 million during the first quarter of 2010.  Cash flow used in investing activities decreased $22.6 million in 2009 over 2008 due to reduced capital expenditures and acquisition activity.

Cash flow used in financing activities in 2010 increased $196.0 million compared to 2009 due to an increase in the number of shares repurchased under our common share repurchase program, increased dividends paid, and the early exchange of our Notes by note holders. Cash flow used in financing activities in 2009 decreased $85.2 million compared to 2008 due to a reduction in the repurchase

25

 

of our common shares and repurchase of our Notes partially offset by proceeds from the sale of the note hedge claim (as discussed in Debt and Capital Lease Obligations).

During the year ended December 31, 2010, we repurchased 1,493,017 shares of our common stock for an aggregate amount of $92.5 million, or an average price of $61.95 per share. The repurchase of shares in the open market is at the discretion of management pursuant to shareholder authorization.  We regard these treasury shares as a temporary investment which may be used to fund restricted shares that vest, stock options that are exercised, finance future acquisitions or to prepare for any obligation we may have to deliver common shares to the holders of our Notes or pursuant to our warrants.  Under Dutch law and subject to certain Dutch statutory provisions and shareholder approval, we can hold a maximum of 50% of our issued shares in treasury. We currently have shareholder approval to hold 25.6% of our issued share capital in treasury.  On June 10, 2010 at our annual shareholders meeting, our shareholders authorized the extension of our share repurchase program of up to 25.6% of our issued share capital from time to time until December 10, 2011. The meeting authorized the Management Board to repurchase up to 10% of our issued share capital which may be used for any legal purpose and an additional 15.6% of our issued share capital which may only be used for the satisfaction of any obligation we may have to deliver shares pursuant to our Notes when they become due or pursuant to our warrants.  We believe this share repurchase program has been beneficial to our shareholders.  Our share price has increased from $4.03 per share in 2002, when we began to repurchase shares, to $89.05 per share on December 31, 2010, an increase of over 2,110%.

Credit Facilities and Available Future Liquidity

In 2006, Core Laboratories LP, a wholly owned subsidiary of Core Laboratories N.V., issued $300 million aggregate principal amount of our Notes which are fully and unconditionally guaranteed by Core Laboratories N.V. and mature on October 31, 2011.

Under the terms of our Notes the early exchange option for the holders of our Notes was enabled in the fourth quarter of 2010, as it was in the second and third quarters of 2010. As a result, our Notes can be exchanged during the first quarter of 2011 and the equity component at December 31, 2010 was classified as temporary equity to reflect the amount that could result in cash settlement upon exchange.  We received 21 requests during 2010 to exchange 82,251 Notes, which were settled during the year for $82.3 million in cash and 808,367 shares of our common stock, all of which were Treasury Shares, resulting in a loss of $1.9 million.

 We received two requests during the fourth quarter of 2010 to exchange five Notes which we will settle during the first quarter of 2011.  Subsequent to December 31, 2010, we have received six additional requests to exchange 40,173 Notes, which we will settle during the first quarter of 2011.

We maintain a revolving credit facility (the "Credit Facility") that allows for an aggregate borrowing capacity of $125.0 million. The Credit Facility provides an option to increase the commitment under the Credit Facility to $200.0 million, if certain conditions are met.  The Credit Facility bears interest at variable rates from LIBOR plus 1.75% to a maximum of LIBOR plus 2.50%.  Any outstanding balance under the Credit Facility is due in December 2015 when the Credit Facility matures.   Interest payment terms are variable depending upon the specific type of borrowing under this facility. Our available capacity is reduced by outstanding letters of credit and performance guarantees and bonds totaling $13.9 million at December 31, 2010 relating to certain projects in progress.  Our available borrowing capacity under the Credit Facility at December 31, 2010 was $111.1 million.  As of December 31, 2010, we had $17.7 million of outstanding letters of credit and performance guarantees and bonds in addition to those under the Credit Facility.

The terms of the Credit Facility require us to meet certain financial covenants, including, but not limited to, certain operational and minimum equity and cash flow ratios. We believe that we are in compliance with all such covenants contained in our credit agreement. All of our material wholly owned subsidiaries are guarantors or co-borrowers under the Credit Facility.

In addition to our repayment commitments under our credit facilities and our Notes, we have capital lease obligations relating to the purchase of equipment, and non-cancelable operating lease arrangements under which we lease property including land, buildings, office equipment and vehicles.

26

 


The following table summarizes our future contractual obligations under these arrangements (in thousands):

   
Total
   
Less than 1 year
   
1-3 Years
   
3-5 Years
   
More than
5 Years
 
Contractual Obligations:
     
                               
Short-term debt (1)
  $ 156,407     $ 156,407     $  -     $  -     $ -  
Operating leases
    53,278       13,965       19,200       10,861       9,252  
Pension (2)
    1,787       1,787       -       -       -  
    Total contractual obligations
  $ 211,472     $ 172,159     $ 19,200     $ 10,861     $ 9,252  
                                         
(1) Not included in the above balances are anticipated cash payments for interest of $0.4 million for 2011 on the short-term debt that is due October 2011.
 
(2) Our Dutch pension plan requires annual employer contributions. Amounts payable in the future will be based on future workforce factors which cannot be projected beyond one year.
 


We have no significant purchase commitments or similar obligations outstanding at December 31, 2010.  Not included in the table above are uncertain tax positions that we have accrued for at December 31, 2010.  We have not included accruals for uncertain tax positions in the table above, as the amounts and timing of payment, if any, are uncertain.

At December 31, 2010, we had tax net operating loss carry-forwards in various tax jurisdictions of approximately $36.2 million. While we cannot be certain that these operating loss carry-forwards will be utilized, we anticipate that we will have sufficient taxable income in future years to allow us to fully utilize the carry-forwards that are not subject to a valuation allowance as of December 31, 2010. If unused, those carry-forwards which are subject to expiration may expire during the years 2011 through 2020. During 2010, $0.3 million of operating loss carry-forwards which carried a full valuation allowance expired unused.

We expect our investment in capital expenditures to be approximately $25 million to $27 million in 2011 which will be used to fund our growth through the purchase of instrumentation, tools and equipment along with expenditures to replace obsolete or worn-out instrumentation, tools and equipment,  to consolidate certain facilities to gain operational efficiencies, and to increase our presence where requested by our clients. In addition, we plan to continue to (i) repurchase our common shares on the open market through our stock repurchase program, (ii) repurchase our Notes, (iii) pay a dividend or (iv) acquire complimentary technologies. Our ability to continue these initiatives depends on, among other things, market conditions and our ability to generate free cash flow.

Our ability to maintain and increase our operating income and cash flows is largely dependent upon continued investing activities. We believe our future cash flows from operating activities, supplemented by our borrowing capacity under existing facilities and our ability to issue additional equity should be sufficient to meet our contractual obligations, capital expenditures, working capital needs and to finance future acquisitions.

Forward-Looking Statements

This Form 10-K and the documents incorporated in this Form 10-K by reference contain forward-looking statements.  These "forward-looking statements" are based on an analysis of currently available competitive, financial and economic data and our operating plans.  They are inherently uncertain and investors should recognize that events and actual results could turn out to be significantly different from our expectations.  By way of illustration, when used in this document, words such as "anticipate", "believe", "expect", "intend", "estimate", "project", "will", "should", "could", "may", "predict" and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements.  You are cautioned that actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in forward-looking statements.  Any forward-looking statements, including statements regarding the intent, belief or current expectations of us or our management, are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions about us and the industry in which we and Core Lab operate, including, among other things:

27

 


-
our ability to continue to develop or acquire new and useful technology;
   
-
the realization of anticipated synergies from acquired businesses and future acquisitions;
   
-
our dependence on one industry, oil and gas, and the impact of commodity prices on the expenditure levels of our clients;
   
-
competition in the markets we serve;
   
-
the risks and uncertainties attendant to adverse industry, political, economic and financial market conditions, including stock prices, government regulations, interest rates and credit availability;
   
-
unsettled political conditions, war, civil unrest, currency controls and governmental actions in the numerous countries in which we operate;
   
-
changes in the price of oil and natural gas;
   
-
integration of acquired businesses; and
   
-
the effects of industry consolidation.

Our businesses depend, to a large degree, on the level of spending by oil and gas companies for exploration, development and production activities.  Therefore, a sustained increase or decrease in the price of natural gas or oil, which could have a material impact on exploration, development and production activities, could also materially affect our financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

The above description of risks and uncertainties is by no means all-inclusive, but is designed to highlight what we believe are important factors to consider.  For a more detailed description of risk factors, please see "Item 1A. Risk Factors" in this Form 10-K and our reports and registration statements filed from time to time with the SEC.

All forward-looking statements in this Form 10-K are based on information available to us on the date of this Form 10-K.  We do not intend to update or revise any forward-looking statements that we may make in this Form 10-K or other documents, reports, filings or press releases, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Market Risk

We are exposed to market risk, which is the potential loss arising from adverse changes in market prices and rates. We have not entered, or intend to enter, into derivative financial instruments for hedging or speculative purposes. We do not believe that our exposure to market risks, which are primarily related to interest rate changes, is material.

Interest Rate Risk

From time to time, we are exposed to interest rate risk on our Credit Facility debt, which carries a variable interest rate. At December 31, 2010, we had no variable rate debt outstanding.

Foreign Currency Risk

We operate in a number of international areas which exposes us to foreign currency exchange rate risk. We do not currently hold or issue forward exchange contracts or other derivative instruments for hedging or speculative purposes. (A foreign exchange contract is an agreement to exchange different currencies at a given date and at a specified rate.)  Foreign exchange gains and losses are the result of fluctuations in the USD against foreign currencies and are included in other (income) expense in the statements of operations.  We recognize foreign exchange gains or losses in countries where the USD has fluctuated against the local currency based on our net monetary asset or liability position denominated in that local currency. Foreign exchange gains and losses are summarized in the following table (in thousands):

28

 


   
Year Ended December 31,
 
(Gains) losses by currency
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
                   
Australian Dollar
  $ (135 )   $ (438 )   $ 654  
British Pound
    390       (106 )     654  
Canadian Dollar
    (711 )     (1,686 )     2,706  
Euro
    1,788       (81 )     (132 )
Russian Ruble
    (6 )     421       688  
Venezuelan Bolivar
    (267 )     1,335       (2 )
Other currencies
    (27 )     224       1,987  
Total (gain) loss
  $ 1,032     $ (331 )   $ 6,555  

In Venezuela in mid-2010, several large commercial banks began operating the Translation System for Foreign Currency Denominated Securities (“SITME”) to replace the parallel market rate as the new freely traded rate.   Management determined that the appropriate rates to use for remeasuring the financial statements at December 31, 2009 and 2010 were the parallel market rate and the SITME rate, respectively.  Using the parallel market rate in 2009, we recognized a devaluation of our net monetary assets resulting in a foreign exchange loss of approximately $1.3 million in the fourth quarter. At December 31, 2010, our net monetary assets denominated in VEB in Venezuela were $0.8 million.  We continue our efforts to de-emphasize our operations and financial position in this country.

Credit Risk

Our financial instruments that potentially subject us to concentrations of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents and accounts receivable. All cash and cash equivalents are on deposit at commercial banks or investment firms. Our trade receivables are with a variety of domestic, international and national oil and gas companies. Management considers this credit risk to be limited due to the creditworthiness and financial resources of these financial institutions and companies.

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

For the financial statements and supplementary data required by this Item 8, see Part IV "Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules."

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

None.

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

Our management, under the supervision of and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, has evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures, as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), as of the end of the period covered by this report.  Our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the information required to be disclosed by us in our reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure and is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Based on such evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of December 31, 2010 at the reasonable assurance level.

Our management does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures or our system of internal control over financial reporting will prevent all errors and all fraud.  Further, the design of disclosure controls and internal control over financial reporting must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs.  Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within a company have been detected.

29

 


Management's Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as that term is defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) of the Exchange Act.  Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements.  Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

Our management, under the supervision of and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, conducted an evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010. In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth in Internal Control − Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this assessment using these criteria, our management determined that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2010.

The effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010, has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which appears herein.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There was no change in our system of internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act, during our fiscal quarter ended December 31, 2010 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.


ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

None.


PART III

The information required by Part III (Items 10 through 14) is incorporated by reference from our definitive proxy statement to be filed in connection with our 2011 annual meeting of shareholders pursuant to Regulation 14A under the Exchange Act. We expect to file our definitive proxy statement with the SEC within 120 days after the close of the year ended December 31, 2010.

30

 

PART IV

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

(a)
Financial Statements

1. The following reports, financial statements and schedules are filed herewith on the pages indicated:

 
Page
   

2. Financial Statement Schedule

Schedule II - Valuation and Qualifying Account

(b)
Exhibits

The following exhibits are incorporated by reference to the filing indicated or are filed herewith.
 
 
Exhibit No.
 
Exhibit Title
 
Incorporated by Reference from the Following Documents
         
3.1
-
Articles of Association of the Company, as amended (including English translation)
 
Form 10-Q, July 26, 2010 (File No. 001-14273)
         
4.1
-
Form of certificate representing Common Shares
 
Form 10-K, March 31, 1999 (File No. 001-14273)
         
4.2
-
Purchase Agreement, dated October 31, 2006, among Core Laboratories LP, Core Laboratories N.V., Lehman Brothers Inc. and Banc of America Securities LLC
 
Form 8-K, November 6, 2006 (File No. 001-14273)
         
4.3
-
Indenture, dated November 6, 2006, among Core Laboratories LP, as Issuer, Core Laboratories N.V., as guarantor, and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as trustee, including the form of 0.25% Senior Exchangeable Notes due 2011
 
Form 8-K, November 6, 2006 (File No. 001-14273)
         
4.4
-
Registration Rights Agreement, dated as of November 6, 2006, among Core Laboratories LP, Core Laboratories N.V., Lehman Brothers Inc. and Banc of America Securities LLC
 
Form 8-K, November 6, 2006 (File No. 001-14273)
         
4.5
-
Note Hedge Confirmation, dated October 31, 2006, among Core Laboratories LP, and Lehman Brothers OTC Derivatives Inc.
 
Form 8-K, November 6, 2006 (File No. 001-14273)
         
4.6
-
Warrant Confirmation, dated October 31, 2006, among Core Laboratories N.V. and Lehman Brothers OTC Derivatives Inc.
 
Form 8-K, November 6, 2006 (File No. 001-14273)
         
4.7
-
Amendment to Note Hedge Confirmation, dated November 15, 2006, among Core Laboratories LP, and Lehman Brothers OTC Derivatives Inc.
 
Form 8-K, November 20, 2006 (File No. 001-14273)
         
4.8
-
Amendment to Warrant Confirmation, dated November 15, 2006, among Core Laboratories N.V. and Lehman Brothers OTC Derivatives Inc.
 
Form 8-K, November 20, 2006 (File No. 001-14273)

31

 
 
 
         
10.1
-
Core Laboratories N.V. 1995 Long-Term Incentive Plan (as amended and restated effective as of May 29, 1997)
 
Proxy Statement dated April 28, 1997 for Annual Meeting of Shareholders (File No. 000-26710)
         
10.2
-
Form of Indemnification Agreement to be entered into by the Company and certain of its directors and officers
 
Form F-1, September 20, 1995 (File No. 000-26710)
         
10.3
-
Amended and Restated Credit Agreement among Core Laboratories N.V., Core Laboratories, Inc., Core Laboratories (U.K.) Limited, Bankers Trust Company, NationsBank, N.A. and the Bank Group, dated as of July 18, 1997
 
Form S-3, October 31, 1997 (File No. 333-39265)
         
10.4
-
Core Laboratories Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan effective as of January 1, 19981
 
Form 10-K, March 31, 1998 (File No. 000-26710)
         
10.5
-
Core Laboratories Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan for Monty L. Davis effective January 1, 19991
 
Form 10-Q, August 16, 1999 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.6
-
Amendment to Core Laboratories Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan filed January 1, 1998, effective July 29, 19991
 
Form 10-Q, August 16, 1999 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.7
-
Note and Guarantee Agreement by Core Laboratories, Inc. for Guaranteed Senior Notes, Series A, and Guaranteed Senior Notes, Series B, dated as of July 22, 1999
 
Form 10-Q, August 16, 1999 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.8
-
First Amendment to Core Laboratories N.V. 1995 Long-Term Incentive Plan (as amended and restated effective as of May 29, 1997)
 
Form 10-K, March 15, 2001 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.9
-
Amendment to Core Laboratories N.V. 1995 Long-Term Incentive Plan (as amended and restated effective as of May 29, 1997)
 
Form 10-Q, May 15, 2003 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.10
-
Amendment to Core Laboratories Supplement Executive Retirement Plan1
 
Form 10-Q, May 15, 2003 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.11
-
Non-Employee Director Compensation Summary
 
Form 10-K, February 20, 2008 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.12
-
Third Amended and Restated Credit Agreement among Core Laboratories N.V., Core Laboratories LP, JP Morgan Chase Bank, N.A., Bank of America, N.A., JP Morgan Securities Inc. and Banc of America Securities LLC, dated as of March 24, 2005
 
Form 10-Q, May 4, 2005 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.13
-
First Amendment to the Third Amended and Restated Credit Agreement among Core Laboratories N.V., Core Laboratories LP, JP Morgan Chase Bank, N.A., Bank of America, N.A., JP Morgan Securities Inc. and Banc of America Securities LLC, dated as of December 20, 2005
 
Form 8-K, December 23, 2005 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.14
-
Core Laboratories N.V. 2006 Nonemployee Director Stock Incentive Plan
 
Proxy Statement dated May 17, 2006 for Annual Meeting of Shareholders (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.15
-
Second Amendment to the Third Amended and Restated Credit Agreement among Core Laboratories N.V., Core Laboratories LP, JP Morgan Chase Bank, N.A., Bank of America, N.A., JP Morgan Securities Inc. and Banc of America Securities LLC, dated as of July 7, 2006
 
Form 8-K, November 7, 2006 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.16
-
Third Amendment to the Third Amended and Restated Credit Agreement among Core Laboratories N.V., Core Laboratories LP, JP Morgan Chase Bank, N.A., Bank of America, N.A., JP Morgan Securities Inc. and Banc of America Securities LLC, dated as of November 6, 2006
 
Form 8-K, November 7, 2006 (File No. 001-14273)


32

 

 
         
10.17
-
Form of Director Performance Share Award Restricted Share Agreement (ROE Based) 1
 
Form 10-K, February 20, 2007 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.18
-
Form of Restricted Share Award Program Agreement1
 
Form 10-K, February 20, 2007 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.19
-
Fourth Amended and Restated Credit Agreement among Core Laboratories N.V., Core Laboratories LP, Bank of America, N.A., and Banc of America Securities LLC, dated as of January 22, 2008
 
Form 8-K, January 23, 2008 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.20
-
Form of Restated Employment Agreement between Core Laboratories N.V. and David M. Demshur dated as of December 31, 20071
 
Form 10-Q, May 12, 2008 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.21
-
Form of Restated Employment Agreement between Core Laboratories N.V. and Richard L. Bergmark dated as of December 31, 20071
 
Form 10-Q, May 12, 2008 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.22
-
Form of Restated Employment Agreement between Core Laboratories N.V. and Monty L. Davis dated as of December 31, 20071
 
Form 10-Q, May 12, 2008 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.23
-
Amendment to Core Laboratories Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan dated as of March 5, 20081
 
Form 10-Q, May 12, 2008 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.24
-
Amendment to Core Laboratories Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan for Monty L. Davis dated as of March 5, 20081
 
Form 10-Q, May 12, 2008 (File No. 001-14273)
         
10.25
-
Fifth Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, dated as of December 17, 2010, among Core Laboratories N.V., Core Laboratories LP and the lenders party thereto and Bank of America, N.A., as administrative agent.
 
Filed Herewith
         
10.26
-
Amendment to Restated Employment Agreement dated December 31, 2007, between Core Laboratories N.V. and David M. Demshur1
 
Filed Herewith
         
10.27
-
Amendment to Restated Employment Agreement dated December 31, 2007, between Core Laboratories N.V. and Richard L. Bergmark1
 
Filed Herewith
         
10.28
-
Amendment to Restated Employment Agreement dated December 31, 2007, between Core Laboratories N.V. and Monty L. Davis1
 
Filed Herewith
         
21.1
-
Subsidiaries of the Registrant
 
Filed Herewith
         
23.1
-
Consent of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
 
Filed Herewith
         
31.1
-
Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Rule 13a-14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
Filed Herewith
         
31.2
-
Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Rule 13a-14 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
Filed Herewith
         
32.1
-
Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
Furnished Herewith
         
32.2
-
Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, As Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
Furnished Herewith
         
1) Management contracts or compensatory plans or arrangements.
 
 

33

 

SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

   
CORE LABORATORIES N.V.
   
By its sole managing director, Core Laboratories International B.V.
     
Date: February 18, 2011
By:
/s/ JAN WILLEM SODDERLAND
   
Jan Willem Sodderland
   
Managing Director of Core Laboratories International B.V.

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities indicated, on the 18th day of February 2011.

 
Signature
 
 
Title
     
/s/ DAVID M. DEMSHUR
 
President, Chief Executive Officer,
David M. Demshur
 
Chairman and Supervisory Director
     
/s/ RICHARD L. BERGMARK
 
Executive Vice President, Chief
Richard L. Bergmark
 
Financial Officer, Treasurer and
   
Supervisory Director
     
/s/ C. BRIG MILLER
 
Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer
C. Brig Miller
   
     
/s/ JOSEPH R. PERNA
 
Supervisory Director
Joseph R. Perna
   
     
/s/ JACOBUS SCHOUTEN
 
Supervisory Director
Jacobus Schouten
   
     
/s/ RENE R. JOYCE
 
Supervisory Director
Rene R. Joyce
   
     
/s/ MICHAEL C. KEARNEY
 
Supervisory Director
Michael C. Kearney
   
     
/s/ D. JOHN OGREN
 
Supervisory Director
D. John Ogren
   
     
/s/ ALEXANDER VRIESENDORP
 
Supervisory Director
Alexander Vriesendorp
   
     


34

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Supervisory Board of Directors and Shareholders of Core Laboratories N.V.:

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements listed in the index appearing under Item 15(a)(1) present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Core Laboratories N.V. (a Netherlands corporation) and its subsidiaries at December 31, 2010 and 2009, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2010 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.  In addition, in our opinion, the financial statement schedule listed in the index appearing under Item 15(a)(2) presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein when read in conjunction with the related consolidated financial statements.  Also in our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).  The Company's management is responsible for these financial statements, the financial statement schedule, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management's Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting appearing under Item 9A of Part II of this Form 10-K. Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements, on the financial statement schedule and on the Company's internal control over financial reporting based on our integrated audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States).  Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects.  Our audits of the financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation.  Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk.  Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.  A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements.  Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.




Houston, Texas
February 16, 2011






F-1

 

CORE LABORATORIES N.V.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
December 31, 2010 and 2009
(In thousands, except share and per share data)

   
2010
   
2009
 
ASSETS
           
CURRENT ASSETS:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 133,880     $ 181,045  
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $3,396 and 
$3,202 at 2010 and 2009, respectively
    154,726       133,758  
Inventories, net
    33,979       32,184  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
    26,735       43,550  
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS
    349,320       390,537  
                 
PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, net
    104,223       98,784  
INTANGIBLES, net
    8,660       6,520  
GOODWILL
    154,217       148,600  
OTHER ASSETS
    19,622       13,725  
TOTAL ASSETS
  $ 636,042     $ 658,166  
                 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
               
CURRENT LIABILITIES:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 44,710     $ 33,009  
Accrued payroll and related costs
    28,621       24,368  
Taxes other than payroll and income
    7,796       8,183  
Unearned revenues
    20,181       16,528  
Income taxes payable
    21,004       15,433  
Short-term debt - senior exchangeable notes
    147,543       -  
Other accrued expenses
    9,498       8,887  
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES
    279,353       106,408  
                 
LONG-TERM DEBT
    -       209,112  
DEFERRED COMPENSATION
    21,241       16,866  
DEFERRED TAX LIABILITIES
    2,198       7,692  
OTHER LONG-TERM LIABILITIES
    32,046       36,330  
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
               
                 
EQUITY COMPONENT OF SHORT-TERM DEBT - SENIOR EXCHANGEABLE NOTES
    8,864       -  
                 
EQUITY:
               
Preference shares, EUR 0.02 par value;
      6,000,000 shares authorized, none issued or outstanding
    -       -  
Common shares, EUR 0.02 par value;
        200,000,000 shares authorized, 49,739,912 issued and 45,521,186 outstanding
at 2010 and 51,039,912 issued and 45,973,408 outstanding at 2009
    1,397       1,430  
Additional paid-in capital
    -       61,719  
Retained earnings
    536,991       469,454  
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
    (6,207 )     (6,536 )
Treasury shares (at cost), 4,218,726 at 2010 and 5,066,504 at 2009
    (242,690 )     (246,699 )
Total Core Laboratories N.V. shareholders’ equity
    289,491       279,368  
Non-controlling interest
    2,849       2,390  
TOTAL EQUITY
    292,340       281,758  
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
  $ 636,042     $ 658,166  





The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements.

F-2

 

CORE LABORATORIES N.V.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
For the Years Ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008
(In thousands, except per share data)

 
 
2010
   
2009
   
2008
 
                   
REVENUES:
                 
Services
  $ 605,974     $ 553,772     $ 597,695  
Product sales
    188,679       141,767       183,141  
      794,653       695,539       780,836  
OPERATING EXPENSES:
                       
Cost of services, exclusive of depreciation shown below
    383,079       352,039       387,145  
Cost of product sales, exclusive of depreciation shown below
    130,711       105,730       127,637  
General and administrative expenses
    33,029       30,372       31,646  
Depreciation
    21,820       23,106       21,063  
Amortization
    1,293       712       710  
Other (income) expense, net
    (2,205 )     (3,202 )     5,580  
OPERATING INCOME
    226,926       186,782       207,055  
(Gain) loss on early extinguishment of debt
    1,939       -       (2,829 )
Interest expense
    15,839       15,523       21,610  
Income before income tax expense
    209,148       171,259       188,274  
Income tax expense
    63,747       57,164       56,766  
Net income
    145,401       114,095       131,508  
Net income attributable to non-controlling interest
    484       491       342  
Net income attributable to Core Laboratories N.V.
  $ 144,917     $ 113,604     $ 131,166  
 
EARNINGS PER SHARE INFORMATION:
                       
                         
Basic earnings per share attributable to Core Laboratories N.V.
  $ 3.23     $ 2.47     $ 2.85  
                         
                         
Diluted earnings per share attributable to Core Laboratories N.V.
  $ 3.00     $ 2.43     $ 2.74  
                         
Cash dividends per share
  $ 0.89     $ 0.575     $ 0.60  
                         
WEIGHTED AVERAGE COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING:
                       
Basic
    44,830       45,939       46,017  
Diluted
    48,241       46,657       47,887  
                         
                         















The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements.

F-3

 

CORE LABORATORIES N.V.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
For the Years Ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008
(In thousands, except share data)




                           
Accumulated
                         
   
Common Shares
   
Additional
         
Other
   
Treasury Stock
   
Non-
       
   
Number of
   
Par
   
Paid-In
   
Retained
   
Comprehensive
   
Number of
         
Controlling
   
Total
 
   
Shares
   
Value
   
Capital
   
Earnings
   
Income (Loss)
   
Shares
   
Amount
   
Interest
   
Equity
 
BALANCE, December 31, 2007
    46,161,898     $ 1,300     $ 55,907     $ 50,986     $ 226       30,000     $ (1,879 )   $ 1,486     $ 108,026  
Stock options exercised, net of capital taxes
    90,820       3       (1,220 )     (579 )     -       (81,158 )     2,964       -       1,168  
Stock-based compensation, net of awards issued
    259,100       7       4,087       (1,830 )     -       (65,700 )     2,477       -       4,741  
Tax benefit of stock-based awards issued
    -       -       11,037       -       -       -       -       -       11,037  
Repurchases of common shares
    -       -       -       -       -       588,610       (31,740 )     -       (31,740 )
Cancellation of treasury shares
    (3,310,000 )     (104 )     (70,921 )     (49,209 )     -       (3,310,000 )     120,234       -       -  
Dividends paid
    -       -       -       (27,645 )     -       -       -       -       (27,645 )
Adjustment to previously reported treasury shares
    7,838,094       224       58,116       279,377       -       7,838,094       (337,717 )     -       -  
Repurchases of senior exchangeable notes
    -       -       (3,987 )     -       -       -       -       -       (3,987 )
Non-controlling interest contributions
    -       -       -       -